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Thin Red Line
Glass Tiger Lyrics


The hands of time have spoken for the chosen ones
Cold steel glistens in the dawning sun
Destiny and claymore that embraces me
All here to sacrifice for victory

Oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh

Hidden in the shadows where the cold wind comes
A mist queen dances for her fallen sons
Over and over
Her shadow falls over me

Remember no retreat, for here you die where you stand
It's chance that brings the Rory's to this foreign land
The crimson and the claymore make you strangers to fear
A thin red streak tipped with a line of steel

Shadows fall over me
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line

Now the battles over, Kedikoi can cry
For all the gallant hill men she's seen fought and die
Red is for the heroes, green is for the brave
Soldiers would you leave me with no souls to save

Shadows fall over me
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line

Oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh
Oh-oh, oh

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Written by: Al Connelly, Alan Graham Frew, Sam Reid

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Most interesting comments from YouTube:

theaterdream

@MisterG I listen to very few “modern” artists. Lady Gaga and Bruno Mars, and…um.

Rock is in dire straits now (and not the great Mark Knopfler band); so much of what’s on the radio, or satellite radio, is soulless tripe. Auto tuned crap.

While I don’t like or even love every genre, I was born in 1971, and the music that I was exposed to growing up, really from about the mid 70s to the mid 80s, represents the greatest explosion of creativity in popular music history. That’s not to take away anything from the great bands whose origin came before, many of which I love. But think about it. Progressive rock really exploded in that time. Yes, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Genesis, Marillion, Kansas, Rush, even early Queen was heavily progressive with their thematic approach and complex arrangements (especially on Queen II, Sheer Heart Attack, ANATO and ADATR). There were so many fabulous hard rock acts playing in huge stadiums. Deep Purple, The Who were at their absolute peak, Led Zeppelin, etc. Marillion transitioned to a more progressive band with their lead singers changing, Fish being replaced by Steve Hogarth. I’ve never been a real fan of punk, as I tend to gravitate towards bands with real musicianship-but the Sex Pistols, The Ramones, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground, which were more avant-garde-the attitude was a breath of fresh air. The Police began as a punk band, and they evolved, as did the GoGos, who started as punk, and moved more towards pop. That crossed over some into both glam rock/metal (Queen again, David Bowie, Sweet) and pop/disco like Blondie. The Bee Gees were huge. You saw lines blurred between disco and r&b, soul. There was an explosion of Southern rock with Lynyrd Skynyrd, .38 Special, The Allman Brothers. Beaches off from Southern Rock was a hybrid of rock and some slight country influences in bands like The Eagles. Then, in the early 80s, you had the advent of synth pop and the second British Invasion. Duran Duran, Tears For Fears, Howard Jones, Erasure, Depeche Mode, Ah ha…Canadian rock bands became virtually their own genre with Rush moving into more mainstream rock and embracing synthesizers, along with Triumph, Glass Tiger, Bryan Adams. Then metal really emerged in the middle of the 80s. Hair metal bands were everywhere. Quiet Riot, Ratt, Whitesnake, Dokken. Iron Maiden, Dio, Rainbow, Judas Priest, etc. These bands all featured virtuoso guitarists. Randy Rhoads with QR before he joined Ozzy’s band. Warren DiMarrini, George Lynch, John Sykes. Ritchie Blackmore, Glenn Tipton and KK Downing, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith. Motley Crue was huge, as were Def Leppard. The instrumentalist guitarist emerged-Steve Vai, Joe Satriani et all. Then really heavy metal with speed metal, Metallica, Testament, Anthrax, Megadeth. You had the birth of my favorite genre, modern progressive metal. Queensryche, Dream Theater, and the godfathers of prof metal, Fates Warning, who switched from being a pure metal band to a progressive metal one with the arrival of drummer Mark Zander and vocalist Ray Alder. Towards the end of the 80s, before grunge ruined everything, bands like Guns and Roses deconstructed metal to their roots. A new collection of bands right at the end of the decade: Saraya, Badlands with Jake E. Lee and Ray Gillen, the supergroup power trio Blue Murder, Enid Z’Nuff….

I could go on and on. But there will never be that kind of artistic freedom and creativity again.

I’m pushing 50 now, and while we all wish we were younger again, I loved growing up when I did. The music kicked ass, and I’ll be listening to all of it until they stick me in the ground.



T H L

The hands of time have spoken for the chosen ones
Cold steel glistens in the dawning sun
Destiny and claidemaugh that embraces me
All here to sacrifice for victory

Hidden in the shadows where the cold wind comes
A mist queen dances for her fallen sons
Over and over
Her shadow falls over me

Remember no retreat, for here you die where you stand
It's chance that brings the Rory's to this foreign land
The crimson and the claidemaugh make you strangers to fear
A thin red streak tipped with a line of steel

Shadows fall over me
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line

Now the battles over, Kedikoi can cry
For all the gallant hillmen she's seen fought and die
Red is for the heroes green is for the brave
Soldiers would you leave me with no souls to save

Shadows fall over me
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line
All for the thin red line

Oh oh oh oh oh



All comments from YouTube:

Ron Rompen

The Thin Red Line was a description in the English and Scottish press of this incident where around 200 men of the 93rd, aided by a small force of 100 walking wounded, 40 detached Guardsmen, and supported by a substantial force of Turkish infantrymen, led by Sir Colin Campbell, routed a Russian cavalry charge. There were more Victoria Crosses presented to the Highland soldiers at that time than at any other. The event was lionized in the British press and became an icon of the qualities of the British soldier in a war that was poorly managed and increasingly unpopular. The commander, Colin Campbell, formed the line of men two deep. Convention dictated that the line should be four deep. However, Campbell, felt he had insufficient trained men to form square, and met the charge head on with the 2-deep firing line. As the Russian cavalry approached, the Turks on the flanks broke and fled. The 93rd discharged three volleys: at 600, 350 and 150 yards respectively, however they did not get a chance to discharge one at point blank range as the Russians turned away. The Times correspondent, William H. Russell, wrote about the event in his November 14, 1854, article, Heights Before Sebastopol. He described how he could see nothing between the charging Russians and the British regiment’s base of operations at Balaklava but the “thin red streak tipped with a line of steel” of the 93rd. Popularly condensed into “the thin red line,” the phrase became a symbol of British composure in battle

Laura-Lee Rahn

Cool. Thanks for the history lesson. Back in the day, BEFORE the Internet and Google, I could barely find a scrap of info about this historic event. LL 🙋🏻‍♀️✝🇨🇦❤

Marco393

Possibly one of the most under appreciated bands and songs ever. Easily one of my favourite songs

PJ

This was my favorite song besides the typical tea that were on the radio all the time.

PJ

Totally agree

Stephanie Hopkins

@Allan Marwood It's a great song. I just hadn't heard it in a long time. I was humming it and trying to figure out what it was. Took a bit before but finally came to me.

Allan Marwood

@Stephanie Hopkins it never left mine

Stephanie Hopkins

Love it! Popped in my head this morning!

8 More Replies...

theaterdream

Still love this song and album some 30 years later. I, too, am a metal head, but good, melodic music defies categorization.

I was into Tears For Fears, Duran Duran, Glass Tiger, Howard Jones etc before I ever got into hard rock and metal.

The 80s were a magical time!

theaterdream

@MisterG I listen to very few “modern” artists. Lady Gaga and Bruno Mars, and…um.

Rock is in dire straits now (and not the great Mark Knopfler band); so much of what’s on the radio, or satellite radio, is soulless tripe. Auto tuned crap.

While I don’t like or even love every genre, I was born in 1971, and the music that I was exposed to growing up, really from about the mid 70s to the mid 80s, represents the greatest explosion of creativity in popular music history. That’s not to take away anything from the great bands whose origin came before, many of which I love. But think about it. Progressive rock really exploded in that time. Yes, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Genesis, Marillion, Kansas, Rush, even early Queen was heavily progressive with their thematic approach and complex arrangements (especially on Queen II, Sheer Heart Attack, ANATO and ADATR). There were so many fabulous hard rock acts playing in huge stadiums. Deep Purple, The Who were at their absolute peak, Led Zeppelin, etc. Marillion transitioned to a more progressive band with their lead singers changing, Fish being replaced by Steve Hogarth. I’ve never been a real fan of punk, as I tend to gravitate towards bands with real musicianship-but the Sex Pistols, The Ramones, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground, which were more avant-garde-the attitude was a breath of fresh air. The Police began as a punk band, and they evolved, as did the GoGos, who started as punk, and moved more towards pop. That crossed over some into both glam rock/metal (Queen again, David Bowie, Sweet) and pop/disco like Blondie. The Bee Gees were huge. You saw lines blurred between disco and r&b, soul. There was an explosion of Southern rock with Lynyrd Skynyrd, .38 Special, The Allman Brothers. Beaches off from Southern Rock was a hybrid of rock and some slight country influences in bands like The Eagles. Then, in the early 80s, you had the advent of synth pop and the second British Invasion. Duran Duran, Tears For Fears, Howard Jones, Erasure, Depeche Mode, Ah ha…Canadian rock bands became virtually their own genre with Rush moving into more mainstream rock and embracing synthesizers, along with Triumph, Glass Tiger, Bryan Adams. Then metal really emerged in the middle of the 80s. Hair metal bands were everywhere. Quiet Riot, Ratt, Whitesnake, Dokken. Iron Maiden, Dio, Rainbow, Judas Priest, etc. These bands all featured virtuoso guitarists. Randy Rhoads with QR before he joined Ozzy’s band. Warren DiMarrini, George Lynch, John Sykes. Ritchie Blackmore, Glenn Tipton and KK Downing, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith. Motley Crue was huge, as were Def Leppard. The instrumentalist guitarist emerged-Steve Vai, Joe Satriani et all. Then really heavy metal with speed metal, Metallica, Testament, Anthrax, Megadeth. You had the birth of my favorite genre, modern progressive metal. Queensryche, Dream Theater, and the godfathers of prof metal, Fates Warning, who switched from being a pure metal band to a progressive metal one with the arrival of drummer Mark Zander and vocalist Ray Alder. Towards the end of the 80s, before grunge ruined everything, bands like Guns and Roses deconstructed metal to their roots. A new collection of bands right at the end of the decade: Saraya, Badlands with Jake E. Lee and Ray Gillen, the supergroup power trio Blue Murder, Enid Z’Nuff….

I could go on and on. But there will never be that kind of artistic freedom and creativity again.

I’m pushing 50 now, and while we all wish we were younger again, I loved growing up when I did. The music kicked ass, and I’ll be listening to all of it until they stick me in the ground.

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