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Scarborough Fair/Canticle
Simon & Garfunkel Lyrics


Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine

Tell her to make me a cambric shirt (in the deep forest green)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
(Tracing of sparrow on snow-crested ground)
Without no seams nor needle work
(Bedclothes the child of the mountain)
Then she'll be a true love of mine
(Sleeps unaware of the clarion call)

Tell her to find me an acre of land
(A sprinkling of leaves)
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
(Washes the grave with silvery tears)
Between the salt water and the sea strands
(And polishes a gun)
Then she'll be a true love of mine

Tell her to reap it with a sickle of leather
(Blazing in scarlet battalions)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
(Generals order their soldiers to kill)
And gather it all in a bunch of heather
(A cause they've long ago forgotten)
Then she'll be a true love of mine

Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Written by: Arthur Garfunkel, Paul Simon

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Bernard Putersznit

Lyrics
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt (in the deep forest green)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
(Tracing of sparrow on snow-crested ground)
Without no seams nor needle work
(Bedclothes the child of the mountain)
Then she'll be a true love of mine
(Sleeps unaware of the clarion call)
Tell her to find me an acre of land
(A sprinkling of leaves)
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
(Washes the grave with silvery tears)
Between the salt water and the sea strands
(And polishes a gun)
Then she'll be a true love of mine
Tell her to reap it with a sickle of leather
(Blazing in scarlet battalions)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
(Generals order their soldiers to kill)
And gather it all in a bunch of heather
(A cause they've long ago forgotten)
Then she'll be a true love of mine
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
She once was a true love of mine



All comments from YouTube:

Ben W.

This is so haunting. Those harmonies are just unreal.

MManuRere

@Daniel I Herbs in old folk songs (and the Scarborough Fair part of this one is *old*) would have been familiar to the people singing them and would have carried symbolic associations broad and local, serious and quirky. Historical musicologists could talk about (and have written doctoral dissertations about) what the specific combination of parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme might have meant in this song -- but it's also possible that from the very beginning it could have meant entirely different things to someone from town A than it would have to someone from town B five miles away (when the song may, for all we know, have been written by two friends from towns C and D just down the road about a mutual object of affection from town E with a very specific set of connotations for the herbs, anywhere on the scale from "heightened aesthetic symbolism" to "bawdy double entendre").

For those of us in the 21st Century, as well as those of us who first heard this song in the 20th, the possibilities for interpretation are broad and enticing.,

Sandy Sizemore

Absolutely beautiful

Wanky Hank's Frankly Dank Spank Bank 👋

I eat hot dogs to this song

Thomas Pankiewicz

@Daniel I no dude... it's about Scarborough fair. they aren't cooking, they're describing the produce that can be bought at a fair

Quinn Rollen

Thank you for sharing the history of this amazing song.

40 More Replies...

Paul Aquino

"Scarborough Fair" is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough.

The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished

As the versions of the ballad known under the title "Scarborough Fair" are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the hypothesis that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages.

Paul Simon learned the song in London in 1965 from Martin Carthy, who had picked up the tune from the songbook by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger and included it on his eponymous 1965 album. Simon & Garfunkel set it in counterpoint with "Canticle"—a reworking of the lyrics from Simon's 1963 anti-war song, "The Side of a Hill", set to a new melody composed mainly by Art Garfunkel.

joseph nobile

Intricate is what u wrote I never knew anything of that but it seems so real everything including this 💎 gem song ok

Stacy the Healthy Hedonist

I think the poet just was not going to fall in love with that girl no how and no way. Promising her he would love her only if she could complete a certain number of impossible tasks is like saying "when hell freezes over!" Nothing will get a clinging vine of his back faster than that insult AND he keeps saying she ONCE was a true love of mine. In other words been there, done that, and OVER that! Just my way of looking at it!

62202ify

I always wondered why, parsley sage rosemary thyme, what are they cooking a steak?

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