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Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy
The Andrews Sisters Lyrics


He was a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way
He had a boogie style that no one else could play
He was the top man at his craft
But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft
He's in the army now, a-blowin' reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

They made him blow a bugle for his Uncle Sam
It really brought him down because he couldn't jam
The captain seemed to understand
Because the next day the cap' went out and drafted a band
And now the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

A-toot, a-toot, a-toot-diddelyada-toot
He blows it eight-to-the-bar, in boogie rhythm
He can't blow a note unless the bass and guitar is playin' with 'I'm
He makes the company jump when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

He was our boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B
And when he plays boogie woogie bugle he was buzy as a "bzzz" bee
And when he plays he makes the company jump eight-to-the-bar
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

Toot-toot-toot, toot-diddelyada, toot-diddelyada
Toot, toot, he blows it eight-to-the-bar
He can't blow a note if the bass and guitar isn't with 'I'm
A-a-a-and the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

He puts the boys asleep with boogie every night
And wakes 'em up the same way in the early bright
They clap their hands and stamp their feet
Because they know how he plays when someone gives him a beat
He really breaks it up when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

Da-doo-da da-doo-da-da da
Da-doo-da da-doo-da-da da
Da-doo-da da-doo-da-da da
Da-doo-da da-doo-da-da
A-a-a-and the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B!

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Written by: DON RAYE, HUGHIE PRINCE

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them

Harold Chernofsky

i love them

Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Ira Geolingo

He was a famous trumpet man from out Chicago way
He had a boogie style that no one else could play
He was the top man at his craft
But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft
He's in the army now, a blowin' reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

They made him blow a bugle for his Uncle Sam
It really brought him down because he couldn't jam
The captain seemed to understand
Because the next day the cap' went out and drafted a band
And now the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

A toot, a toot, a toot diddelyada toot
He blows it eight to the bar, in boogie rhythm
He can't blow a note unless the bass and guitar is playin' with 'I'm
He makes the company jump when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

He was our boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B
And when he plays boogie woogie bugle he was buzy as a bzzz bee
And when he plays he makes the company jump eight to the bar
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

Toot toot toot, toot diddelyada, toot diddelyada
Toot, toot, he blows it eight to the bar
He can't blow a note if the bass and guitar isn't with 'I'm
A a a and the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

He puts the boys asleep with boogie every night
And wakes 'em up the same way in the early bright
They clap their hands and stamp their feet
Because they know how he plays when someone gives him a beat
He really breaks it up when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B

Da doo da da doo da da da
Da doo da da doo da da da
Da doo da da doo da da da
Da doo da da doo da da
A a a and the company jumps when he plays reveille
He's the boogie woogie bugle boy of Company B



All comments from YouTube:

Avenger 280

My Great Aunt Bessie was one of the first women to enlist in the Women's Army Corp (WACs) in 1943. I wrote a thesis about her when I was in college in 1982. She died in 2010 at age 103. She was my hero!!!!!!

iirwin wong

what was her anme

artistpw

My mom enlisted and she was the only WAC I ever knew. She was born in 1923 and I think she may have enlisted in 1941 as soon as she could. She was a med tech and could have been an officer but that would have removed her from the operating area. She passed away in 2011 at 88.

Linda Rogow

I am a writer in phoenix. Can i get a copy of your thesis. Can you contact me. Phone. 480 240 0999

RedneckCowboyFeller

Awesome! My maternal grandmother was naval intelligence officer during WW2, she was among the first batch of 108 women accepted into the WAVES program (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) in 1942. She was stationed at what is today Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam throughout most of the war working on various intelligence and cryptography projects. She remained in the Womens' Reserve for many years after the war, retiring as an O-3. She passed away in 2009. I suspect her example was a large part of what inspired my mother to earn a ROTC commission (graduated first in her class, one of six female graduates in her ROTC class - versus sixty-odd males) in the USAF, serving nearly thirty years and retiring as an O-6. She passed away a few months ago. I have various newspaper clippings about both of them.

Kate

I think she is my hero too !! Very cool woman....peace love and happiness to you and yours :)

97 More Replies...

Webly Pug

The Andrews Sisters boarded a train one evening in 1944 after having performed in Ottawa, Canada. My future mother, who had lived & worked in the city, was boarding the same train, headed for Saskatoon in order to marry my future father. She was accompanied by three of her friends who wished to wave her good-bye. When the party of four got to the train station, where many Andrews Sisters' fans had congregated, my mom quipped "Oh, my goodness! I didn't think this many people would be here to see me leave". All involved in this story are now gone, but the husband of one of the gals who'd accompanied Mom to the station is still alive. He clarified some of the points of this story. He was a Canadian heavy bomber pilot stationed out of England, eventually earning the monicker "Crash", due to several (four) hair-raising combat mission escapades with the various craft he was piloting. I've carried this insignificant little story with me for decades, & feel I've finally found a forum in which to share it.

bob pete

Thanks for sharing (from Ontario)

Tom Donohue

THANK YOU! I love your story! I have a few favorite stories from both my parents about WW2 and they are precious to me. So glad your shared your story, your mom sounds like alot of fun.

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