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Tea for Two
Art Tatum Lyrics


Tea For Two
Tony Bennett
(Irving Caesar/Vincent Youmans)

I'm discontented with homes that are rented so I have invented my own.
Darling this place is a lover's oasis where life's weary chase is unknown.
Far from the cry of the city, where flowers pretty caress the streams,
Cozy to hide in, to love side-by-side in. Don't let it abide in my dreams.

Picture you upon my knee, just tea for two and two for tea,
Just me for you and you for me, alone!
Nobody near us, to see us or hear us,
No friends or relations on weekend vacations,
We won't have it known, dear, that we have a telephone, dear.
Day will break and you'll awake and start to bake
A sugar cake for me to take for all the boys to see.
We will raise a family, a boy for you, a girl for me,
Oh, can't you see how happy life would be?

You are revealing a plan so appealing I can't help but falling for you,
Darling, I planned it; can't you understand it is yours to command it, so do.
All of your schemes I'm admiring, they're worth desiring but can't you see,
I'd like to wait there for some future date dear;
it won't be too late, dear, for me.

Picture you upon my knee, just tea for two and two for tea,
Just me for you and you for me, alone!
Nobody near us, to see us or hear us,
No friends or relations on weekend vacations,
We won't have it known, dear, that we have a telephone, dear.
Day will break and you'll awake and start to bake
A sugar cake for me to take for all the boys to see.
We will raise a family, a boy for you, a girl for me,
Oh, can't you see how happy life would be?

Lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Written by: IRVING CAESAR, VINCENT YOUMANS

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Andrew Barrett

@hawkturkey Most pop pianists in the 1920s were playing 10ths in the left hand as a matter of course, since, starting approximately 1915 or so, that 'came into style' and became more and more accepted to the point where pianists with smaller hands would break the tenths to 'make do' and keep up with fashion.

In fact, forward-broken left hand tenths with the lower note starting just before the beat (about a half a beat before), and the upper notes landing ON the beat, were 'de rigeur' from around 1915 to 1925, which is also coincidentally when the player piano was at its very height of popularity as home entertainment, so most pianists making rolls played in this style, and most of the really popular vintage rolls from this period, featured this left-hand style, so it's been (somewhat incorrectly) thought of as a "player piano style" despite some of the earliest exponents of it (Max Kortlander, Charley Straight, Pete Wendling, and many others) apparently playing in this style live, in and out of vaudeville years BEFORE they made their first piano rolls.

After about 1925, this style was still heard and played, but by the late 1920s, the 'hipper' pianists had stopped breaking the tenths (if possible) and were playing them STRAIGHT ON, or unbroken. This can already be heard in Pete Wendling's recordings from 1926, as well as most later Fats Waller, Earl Hines and Teddy Wilson records (as well as later pop pianists like Frankie Carle).

Of course, not too many people can reach all the 10ths straight on due to the span / geometry of the standard piano keyboard.

Those with larger hands could, such as Eubie Blake, Luckey Roberts, Pete Wendling, Roy Bargy and of course Fats Waller. Most of the above-named gentlemen actually had hands so large they could reach over an 11, reportedly as much as a 12th, 13th, or in some cases just short of two octaves!

They were the exceptions to the rule however, as most pop pianists of that day were smaller people (as most people were in the 1920s... literally shorter in average height than people today), and thus had smaller hands.

However, most pianists with average or on-the-large-side-of-average hands, like me, can at least hold down all the MINOR tenths (such as, C to Eb) without breaking them. I can also reach the three major tenths on white keys, and no others.

Art Tatum's two big heroes were Lee Sims and Fats Waller, and they both played lots of 10ths in the left hand, had impeccable, uncanny piano touch, and ushered piano playing into the future, each in their own way.

I am not aware that anyone other than Mr. Tatum ever tried to combine their styles (with lots and lots of other influences of course; for starters, Duke Ellington's entire band; Louis Armstrong; and Earl Hines, plus of course his own ideas).



All comments from YouTube:

Leiki Ueda

"Fuel for two"

Benjamin Myers

Still nothing compared with this version: https://youtu.be/VGK8i9F--7w

Joshua Mallory

Oh my 😵

Jonny May

Fantastic.

Лева Сандлер

Please cover this :)

Ben Rolfe

Tea for Two? More like Red Bull for One

John Marvin

@Tom Parker didn't know he ever quit - very interesting. probably did a number on his health anyway and it was too late by then.

Tom Parker

@John Marvin He was getting drunk since he was a teenager. Probably just an addict. He did quit it in ‘53.

Tom Parker

@horatiodreamt Until 1953 when he stopped drinking alcohol.

John Marvin

methamphetamine for one
in seriousness though, witnesses recount that art tatum almost always got quite drunk before he would play a concert. jury is out as to why!

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