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Piano Man
Billy Joel Lyrics


It's nine o'clock on a Saturday
The regular crowd shuffles in
There's an old man sittin' next to me
Makin' love to his tonic and gin
He says, "Son, can you play me a memory?
I'm not really sure how it goes
But it's sad and it's sweet and I knew it complete
When I wore a younger man's clothes"

La, la-la, di-dee-da
La-la, di-dee-da, da-dum

Sing us a song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright

Now John at the bar is a friend of mine
He gets me my drinks for free
And he's quick with a joke or to light up your smoke
But there's some place that he'd rather be
He says, "Bill, I believe this is killing me"
As the smile ran away from his face
"Well, I'm sure that I could be a movie star
If I could get out of this place"

Oh, la, la-la, di-dee-da
La-la, di-dee-da, da-dum

Now Paul is a real estate novelist
Who never had time for a wife
And he's talkin' with Davy, who's still in the Navy
And probably will be for life
And the waitress is practicing politics
As the businessmen slowly get stoned
Yes, they're sharing a drink they call loneliness
But it's better than drinkin' alone

Sing us a song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright

It's a pretty good crowd for a Saturday
And the manager gives me a smile
'Cause he knows that it's me they've been comin' to see
To forget about life for a while
And the piano, it sounds like a carnival
And the microphone smells like a beer
And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar
And say, "Man, what are you doin' here?"

Oh, la, la-la, di-dee-da
La-la, di-dee-da, da-dum

Sing us a song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Written by: Billy Joel

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Most interesting comments from YouTube:

Viktor

It's nine o'clock on a Saturday
The regular crowd shuffles in
There's an old man sittin' next to me
Makin' love to his tonic and gin
He says, "Son can you play me a memory?
I'm not really sure how it goes
But it's sad and it's sweet and I knew it complete
When I wore a younger man's clothes"
La, la-la, di-di-da
La-la di-di-da da-dum
Sing us a song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright
Now John at the bar is a friend of mine
He gets me my drinks for free
And he's quick with a joke, or to light up your smoke
But there's some place that he'd rather be
He says, "Bill, I believe this is killing me"
As a smile ran away from his face
"Well, I'm sure that I could be a movie star
If I could get out of this place"
Oh, la, la-la, di-di-da
La-la di-di-da da-dum
Now Paul is a real estate novelist
Who never had time for a wife
And he's talkin' with Davy, who's still in the navy
And probably will be for life
And the waitress is practicing politics
As the businessmen slowly get stoned
Yes, they're sharing a drink they call loneliness
But it's better than drinkin' alone
Sing us the song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright
It's a pretty good crowd for a Saturday
And the manager gives me a smile
'Cause he knows that it's me they've been comin' to see
To forget about life for a while
And the piano, it sounds like a carnival
And the microphone smells like a beer
And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar
And say man what are you doin' here?
Oh, la, la-la, di-di-da
La-la di-di-da da-dum
Sing us the song, you're the piano man
Sing us a song tonight
Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
And you've got us feelin' alright



Lachlan Johnson

​@Hernan S The story opens in the late 1960s at Parris Island, South Carolina, the U.S. Marine Corps Training Camp, where a group of young Marine recruits, after having their heads shaved, are being prepped for basic training by the brutal Gunnery Sergeant Hartman (R. Lee Ermey), whose orders are to "weed out all non-hackers". Hartman gives each of the Marines nicknames; one pragmatic recruit who talks behind his back becomes "Joker" (Matthew Modine); a Texas recruit becomes "Cowboy" (Arliss Howard). And finally Leonard Lawrence, a 6-foot 3-inch, 280 pound, slow-witted recruit with low intelligence and ambition becomes "Gomer Pyle" (Vincent D'Onofrio), and the focus of Hartman's brutality, because the overweight recruit cannot keep up with the other more physically fit recruits in the grueling obstacle courses.

Hartman leads the recruits through endless running, marching and rifle drills. When Pyle mixes up right from left, Hartman slaps him viciously and makes him walk behind the platoon with his pants around his ankles while sucking his thumb after he cries from the constant verbal and physically abuse. On the obstacle course, Pyle can't perform pull-ups or climb to the top of one of the higher obstacles, receiving more torrents of verbal abuse from Hartman.

One morning during muster, Hartman asks Joker if he believes in the Virgin Mary. Joker responds that he doesn't, angering the Catholic drill instructor. The clearly religious Hartman gives Joker a vicious backhanded slap and orders Joker to change his answer. Joker stubbornly refuses, stating that he believes that Hartman will only "beat him harder if he reverses himself." Hartman immediately promotes Joker to squad leader for having the courage to stand up for himself. However, Hartman also gives Joker the difficult job of being Pyle's personal instructor. Off on the sidelines over the next few days, Joker helps Pyle through the obstacle courses, shows him how to operate and clean his rifle and how to make his bed. However, all of Joker's effort is later proven to be a waste.

During a routine evening inspection, Hartman, noticing that Pyle's foot locker is unlocked, searches it and finds a jelly doughnut; food is strictly forbidden in the barracks and Pyle is not permitted to eat donuts because he's overweight. Enraged, Hartman decides that from then on instead of punishing Pyle for each transgression, he'll punish all the other recruits in the platoon. A few nights later, the angry recruits attack Pyle with soap bars wrapped in towels while Cowboy gags him and a few others hold him down on his bed with a blanket. At first, Joker is reluctant to attack Pyle, but after Cowboy persuades him, Joker hits Pyle longer and harder than most of the others. In his bunk, Joker covers his ears, ashamed at himself for his actions, while Pyle howls in pain.

After the traumatic experience, Pyle slowly begins to go insane but also shapes up and becomes the fastest and best rifleman, especially after Hartman lectures the platoon on how Lee Harvey Oswald and Charles Whitman were both crack riflemen trained in the Marine Corps. Hartman is impressed with Pyle's shooting skill and his marked improvement in training. Later, when Joker sees Pyle talking to his rifle and staring off into space blankly, and not responding to interaction, he realizes that Pyle is losing his mind ("Section 8"), and confides in Cowboy about Pyle's growing mental breakdown. By the end of basic training, Pyle clearly has been completely dehumanized by its rigors.

After graduation Hartman assigns each recruit a MOS (Military Occupational Specialty), most of them as 0300 (Infantry). One exception is Joker who is assigned as a 4212 (Basic Military Journalism). On the platoon's last night on Parris Island, Joker draws fire watch (guard patrol), during which he discovers Pyle in the bathroom loading his M-14 rifle with live ammunition. Frightened, Joker attempts to calm the insane Pyle, who begins blankly shouting, executing drill commands and reciting the Rifleman's Creed. The noise awakens Hartman, who angrily confronts Pyle and quietly demands that he drop the rifle. When Pyle refuses and does not respond, Hartman hurls further insults at him. Pyle responds by shooting Hartman dead, and then aims the rifle at Joker. Joker pleads with Pyle, who lowers the rifle and nods, possibly in recognition of Joker as a friend. Pyle sits down on a toilet, places the muzzle of the weapon in his mouth and pulls the trigger, killing himself.

One year later, Joker is in Da Nang, reporting on the Vietnam War for the military newspaper Stars and Stripes. He and his partner, combat photographer Rafterman (Kevyn Major Howard), meet a prostitute (Papillon Soo) in the streets and encounter a thief (Nguyen Hue Phong) who steals Rafterman's camera. Walking back to their base, Rafterman remarks how US military forces are there to help the South Vietnamese but they frequently take advantage of them. He also wants to join Joker in the field and get a good story. Joker tells him he won't take him along for fear of Rafterman being killed. They return to their base for a press meeting with their commanding officer, Lt. Lockhart (John Terry), who reviews their latest news offerings and gives some of his corps new assignments and shares new directives about reporting standards. Joker, however, wants to go to the front lines to get a good story. Joker also remarks that there's a lot of talk about the Tet holiday ceasefire and how it may be broken by enemy forces. Lockhart scoffs at the idea, saying that the Vietnamese will simply go about their usual celebration of the holiday.

That evening in the barracks, Rafterman talks with the others GIs about wanting to go into combat, as Joker claims he has done. One of the other GIs mocks Joker, saying he knows Joker has never been in combat because he doesn't have the "thousand-yard stare." The sound of nearby artillery fire interrupts their argument. The North Vietnamese Army are attacking and attempting to overrun the base in what turns out to be the beginning of the Tet Offensive. Joker's unit returns fire but the base is not attacked as heavily as other locations.

The next day, the staff learns about enemy attacks throughout South Vietnam. After Joker cracks wise about Ann-Margaret's impending (but likely canceled) visit to the GIs, Lockhart sends Joker to Phu Bai, a Marine forward operating-base near the ancient Vietnamese city of Hue, to cover the combat taking place in the area. Rafterman accompanies him, hoping to get some combat experience. During the helicopter ride, Joker and Rafterman encounter an insane door gunner who shoots indiscriminately at unarmed Vietnamese civilians on the ground, boasting about his ability to kill.



All comments from YouTube:

JTC

The line
“They’re sharing a drink called loneliness, but it’s better than drinking alone”
Hits hard

Deb Seidle

@JTC how did you figure out life Jake and then f**** go play

Deb Seidle

And your point is

Leesey

An extraordinary comment on alcoholism - a disease which he battles. Hits the nail on the head - in less than 15 words. It represents so many people's struggles in the world. Just brilliant.

The Fakey Cake Maker

Like the drink.

Hole902

3:22

89 More Replies...

Adam Wheeler Productions

I guess I was born in the right generation. I can listen to all kinds of great music with the click of a button.

Michael Cross

@Loading... plot twist: last days of Rome collapse takes that away from you soon

Loading...

That's the real deal. We were born to late to explore the world and to young to explore the universe. But we are right born to explore the internet.

Dixin Buttz

had some good times at the record store back in the day

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