Genre not found
Artist not found
Album not found
Song not found

Off the World
Singapore Rice Lyrics


We have lyrics for 'Off the World' by these artists:

Martin Roth & Alex Bratlett I'm above the shiver line Where you let things come your…
Shoreline Is Ever since we are holy fools Trapped in bodies that Just do…

The lyrics can frequently be found in the comments below or by filtering for lyric videos.
Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Chinese Cooking Demystified

Hey, so a few things:

1. There’s another technique for frying rice noodles that we found was a bit of a headache to work in with this particular dish, but we’d be remiss not to discuss it. For rice noodle dishes generally, a cool technique is to place the rice noodles (without any other ingredients) in a hot wok with an extremely thin shear of oil. Leave it in the wok without touching it for about a minute to let the rice noodles slightly brown. Flip, do the same with the other side, and take it out and reserve for the final stir-fry.

2. I understand that the technique for frying the curry powder might seem a bit odd. For us, we were trying to figure out how to (1) ensure the final dish doesn't end up gritty and (2) making sure it's not oily. For this dish it's really important that those two things aren't mutually exclusive, so that's how we cracked that nut. I just want to emphasize that this is how we personally did it, not some sort of classic technique or anything.

3. For reference, the curry powder we were using in the video was a common brand in Guangdong that’s imported from Kolkata. It consists of coriander, turmeric, chili powder, fenugreek, cumin, anis, ginger, garlic, cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves.

4. We didn't show this in the video because I was going a mile a minute with the veg prep, but for the jiuhuang we're using the middle section only - the white end's fibrous and the yellow end's usually slightly wilted. We got a lot of hate when we talked about tossing the super figrous ends of Gailan in the stir-fried veg vid, so if jiuhuang's expensive where you live you could chop it real fine and toss in a soup I guess?

5. Those beansprouts are Mung Bean sprouts by the way. If you wanna use Soyabean sprouts they'll work in a pinch, but then the 'picking both ends' step changes from 'highly recommended' to 'mandatory'.

6. I know that shrimp was sorta sad looking. It's not shrimp season in Guangdong now, and we didn't feel like dropping the dough for live ones. We're working on a Har Gow video, and if we can nail it (no promises) we'll use nicer shrimp for that one.

7. The MSG was because we didn't use soy sauce. Most recipes add in some light soy sauce, but we really didn't wanna muff up that hard fought color. So if you don't like MSG, add in some soy sauce instead (cutting the salt if half if you go that route) or just skip it if you wanna replicate the color we had here.

8. I hope I didn't mean to imply that this method was the only method for cooking rice noodles. Some people do a cold water soak. Some people cook em and rinse under cool water. It really is personal preference the technique you use - this is the method we feel gives the best end results. If you're already familiar with frying rice noodles, feel free to use what's working for you!

That's all I can think of for now. As you may or may not've been able to tell, I've decided to lay the 'narrator voice' to rest at least for now. Maybe I'm off base here, but I think talking with passion > deep bass.



All comments from YouTube:

aTalkingHead

I recently took a vacation to New York and found a tiny dive spot chinese restaurant in the neighborhood we were staying in, in Brooklyn. They had this dish for $7 with shrimp, pork, and chicken in it. I literally ate it 5 out of the 8 nights I was in New York. I miss that dish so much.

Rosie

"House Special" anything will usually have all 3 shrimp, chicken and pork. I'm having House Special Singapore Mei Fun so delicious...thin noodles with curry powder it's so delicious

M H

They have this at every Chinese restaurant I’ve ever been to

Jenny Leising

I really appreciate the straightforward narration, and background info on types of noodles, origin, etc. Thank you for an awesome channel!

DinosaurOnesie

For me, this was a great dish that helped kick-start my first attempts at Chinese cooking! It was fairly easy to find most of the ingredients at my local grocery store, and it turned out very similar to the noodles I'd had in the past. I would definitely recommend this recipe to anyone new to East Asian cooking (or even cooking in general)!

Teresa Fung

I grew up eating this dish. I still love it. Thank you so much for laying out how to make this at home. I've tried it but you taught me how to season it correctly to make it just the way it should be.

Marc A

You are easily my favorite cooking channel on youtube (and I watch a lot). Thanks to you both. This recipe is no exception because you don't over-complicate things. Really good Chinese cooking has a lot of structure built into it and that shines through in the way you handle each dish. It isn't dogmatic, just really sensical -- and clean and good (I only had to adapt your method/recipe slightly). One question: whenever I have had this dish (not in China, but Penang and Western Indonesia (Sumatera)) it was always intensely aromatic (it always smelled so much more wonderful than other prepared dishes at market), and it was not by basil. What do you recommend?

Chinese Cooking Demystified

Hey, so a few things:

1. There’s another technique for frying rice noodles that we found was a bit of a headache to work in with this particular dish, but we’d be remiss not to discuss it. For rice noodle dishes generally, a cool technique is to place the rice noodles (without any other ingredients) in a hot wok with an extremely thin shear of oil. Leave it in the wok without touching it for about a minute to let the rice noodles slightly brown. Flip, do the same with the other side, and take it out and reserve for the final stir-fry.

2. I understand that the technique for frying the curry powder might seem a bit odd. For us, we were trying to figure out how to (1) ensure the final dish doesn't end up gritty and (2) making sure it's not oily. For this dish it's really important that those two things aren't mutually exclusive, so that's how we cracked that nut. I just want to emphasize that this is how we personally did it, not some sort of classic technique or anything.

3. For reference, the curry powder we were using in the video was a common brand in Guangdong that’s imported from Kolkata. It consists of coriander, turmeric, chili powder, fenugreek, cumin, anis, ginger, garlic, cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves.

4. We didn't show this in the video because I was going a mile a minute with the veg prep, but for the jiuhuang we're using the middle section only - the white end's fibrous and the yellow end's usually slightly wilted. We got a lot of hate when we talked about tossing the super figrous ends of Gailan in the stir-fried veg vid, so if jiuhuang's expensive where you live you could chop it real fine and toss in a soup I guess?

5. Those beansprouts are Mung Bean sprouts by the way. If you wanna use Soyabean sprouts they'll work in a pinch, but then the 'picking both ends' step changes from 'highly recommended' to 'mandatory'.

6. I know that shrimp was sorta sad looking. It's not shrimp season in Guangdong now, and we didn't feel like dropping the dough for live ones. We're working on a Har Gow video, and if we can nail it (no promises) we'll use nicer shrimp for that one.

7. The MSG was because we didn't use soy sauce. Most recipes add in some light soy sauce, but we really didn't wanna muff up that hard fought color. So if you don't like MSG, add in some soy sauce instead (cutting the salt if half if you go that route) or just skip it if you wanna replicate the color we had here.

8. I hope I didn't mean to imply that this method was the only method for cooking rice noodles. Some people do a cold water soak. Some people cook em and rinse under cool water. It really is personal preference the technique you use - this is the method we feel gives the best end results. If you're already familiar with frying rice noodles, feel free to use what's working for you!

That's all I can think of for now. As you may or may not've been able to tell, I've decided to lay the 'narrator voice' to rest at least for now. Maybe I'm off base here, but I think talking with passion > deep bass.

D L

Cooking the curry powder in oil is a definite must, to release its flavors. 👌

After boiling noodles, spread it out on a baking sheet. The way you did it caused them to break in tiny pieces.

Thuy & Ku Ty

I'll try your way for my rice noodles just drain out no soak by cool water as usual we do

More Comments

More Videos