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Eleanor Rigby
The Beatles Lyrics


Jump to: Overall Meaning ↴  Line by Line Meaning ↴

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window
Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie
Writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working
Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby
Died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie
Wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all belong?

Overall Meaning

The song "Eleanor Rigby" by The Beatles tells the story of two lonely people, Eleanor Rigby and Father McKenzie, who lead empty lives without connection or purpose. The song begins by painting a picture of Eleanor Rigby, a woman who "picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been" and "waits at the window, wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door." These images suggest that Eleanor is a lonely woman who spends her days doing menial tasks and hiding her true self from the world. The chorus then poses a question: "All the lonely people, where do they all come from? / All the lonely people, where do they all belong?" This question highlights the theme of loneliness that runs throughout the song.


The second verse shifts the focus to Father McKenzie, a man who "writes the words of a sermon that no one will hear" and "darns his socks in the night when there's nobody there." These details suggest that Father McKenzie is also a lonely figure who spends his days performing thankless tasks for an absent congregation. The chorus repeats before the song returns to Eleanor Rigby, who has died and is buried "along with her name" without anyone to mourn her passing. Father McKenzie is shown wiping the dirt from his hands as he leaves the gravesite, still alone and unable to save anyone.


The song's simple melody and catchy chorus have made it one of The Beatles' most popular and enduring hits, but its touching lyrics and melancholy tone also make it a powerful commentary on the human experience. "Eleanor Rigby" speaks to the isolation and disconnection that many people feel in modern society, as well as the search for meaning and connection that drives us all.


Line by Line Meaning

Ah, look at all the lonely people
Observing the many people who are struggling with loneliness and social isolation.


Eleanor Rigby Picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been Lives in a dream Waits at the window Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door Who is it for?
Describing a lonely woman, Eleanor Rigby, who acts as a church custodian and lives her life in isolation while wondering who she is trying to impress with her appearance.


All the lonely people Where do they all come from? All the lonely people Where do they all belong?
Reflecting on the prevalence of loneliness and the struggles that many people have with feeling like they do not fit in or have a place in society.


Father McKenzie Writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear No one comes near Look at him working Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there What does he care?
Depicting a lonely priest, Father McKenzie, who is committed to his work despite the fact that nobody comes to his sermons, and who is left to handle his own chores in isolation.


Eleanor Rigby Died in the church and was buried along with her name Nobody came Father McKenzie Wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave No one was saved
Telling the sad story of how the lonely Eleanor Rigby died alone and was buried by Father McKenzie, who also had nobody to mourn her death or comfort him in his grief.




Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Written by: John Lennon, Paul McCartney

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Philip Kassabian

Yet another splendid Beatles song.

Most interesting comment from YouTube:

@estefaniagutierrezgaytan9745

Lyrics: (it’s for me, but if helps someone else here is:)
Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people
Eleanor Rigby
Picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits at the window
Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?
All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?
Father McKenzie
Writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working
Darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there
What does he care?
All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?
Ah, look at all the lonely people
Ah, look at all the lonely people
Eleanor Rigby
Died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie
Wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved
All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people (ah, look at all the lonely people)
Where do they all belong?



All comments from YouTube:

@milaanna444

love or hate the beatles you can’t deny this song is pure art.

@shianansen3896

yes u r right

@gaborpete

I used to hate them, I had thought they were boring to death, maybe intentionally boring, until I first heard and saw this song.

@Epsa_

How can anyone hate the Beatles tho fr

@eljudionazisatanista5646

@@Epsa_ hello

@rershyy0174

love or hate the beatles, you can’t deny this is a song

480 More Replies...

@1999sytuao

This is isn't music. This is art.

@average_trans_furry

But.... Music is art though

@bengaler

Art music

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