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Propane Nightmares
by Pendulum

Something's tearing me down and down
And I can't help but feel it's coming from you
She's a gunshot bride as the trigger cries
I just wonder what we've gotten ourselves into

In a trail of fire I know we will be free again
In the end we will be one
In a trail of fire I'll burn before you bury me
Set your sights for the sun

Mind is willing, soul remains
This woman cannot be saved
From the draw into the fire

Mind is willing, soul remains
This woman cannot be saved
From the draw into the fire

Anything to bring it on home
Bring it on home
Bring it on home
Bring it on home

Much to weak to jump yourself
Heal the wounds or crack the shell
Lift yourself from once below

Much to weak to jump yourself
Heal the wounds or crack the shell
Lift yourself from once below

Praise the anger bring it on home
Bring it on home
Bring it on home
Bring it on home

In a trail of fire I know we will be free again
In the end we will be one
In a trail of fire I'll burn before you bury me
Set your sights for the sun

Bring it on home

Lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Written by: BERND BURHOFF, JENS OETTRICH, OLIVER FRONING, ROBERT SWIRE THOMPSON

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Comments from YouTube:

Vemomat !!

The true gathering of TF2, Jojo, Pizzahut, and Tacobell fans

Taco does stuff

Truly the greatest crossover in history

Tomás Lasdica

@Kaan Baykozi Okay, but what has the song to do with that? When it was used like to that?

Kaan Baykozi

@Tomás Lasdica it's not about only pizza hut or only taco bell, it's the combination of pizza hut and taco bell

Tomás Lasdica

@General Nuisance Okay, but what has that to do with Pizza Hut and Taco Bell?

General Nuisance

@Tomás Lasdica Google "Sick Airshot." Its a Soundclown by BangingDonk

11 More Replies...

Waldeo

Good to see people born 2000+ are running across this song.

A little history lesson for those too young to be in the loop:
This used to be a "meme song" that was used for MLG (sometimes used jokingly) or kill compilation videos in FPS shooters (primarily Call of Duty and Team Fortress 2). It, among a list of other songs - usually rock or numetal - would be used to make a video showing an unlikely or impressive kill or maneuver more exciting, and therefore, cooler than it actually was.
Propane Nightmares in particular was predominantly used for impressive - or impressive in the perspective of the uploader - shots. This trend was mainly started by tf2worms' video "300% skilled airshot" in which they played "soldier" (a rocket launcher wielding soldier with many screws loose) and landed a particularly difficult mid-air shot. As can probably be gleaned by the title, it wasn't entirely intentional and the usage of the song was tongue-in-cheek. As such, the usage of the song in the TF2 community was primarily in the same self aware style. Outside communities simply adopted it into their genuine videos, which exposed the song to a larger amount of people.

I should mention that these style of videos were used for other popular games at the time as well. However, they didn't always use the same set of songs.

For example, Halo videos had a tendency to use a song like Breaking Benjamin - Blow Me Away (which was actually used in the soundtrack of Halo 2). The videos also had a distinct difference to others like it: they had a focus on out-maneuvering and out-smarting opponents over just outright killing them. However, the series was very sandbox-y and embraced physics engines quite a bit, so there was almost an equal amount of videos about comedic scenarios caused by it; the combat videos could sometimes crossover with the comedic videos when specific items did something weird (for example, a grenade flying back and forth across a map and hitting the person who threw it a minute later).

Another example is World of Warcraft. These videos were drastically different in content due to the genre of game, but had a similar through-line: doing something impressive. Music used for these videos was, of course, rock for a large amount of them (example: Finger Eleven - Paralyzer), as well as early electronic music - and hip-hop surprisingly.

A massive amount of WoW videos during this time were actually guide videos, which exemplified these music trends consistently. This was most likely due to technological capabilities - as well as mic qualities - those days, so there was a need to have something pleasant / interesting but not distracting in the background. The same need existed in the non-guide videos, but due to the lack of requirement to explain something, the music could be louder and more intense.
Luckily, a large amount of the guide videos still exist online today and aren't particularly difficult to find. I would recommend Nayla's hunter taming guides in particular if you want to look through that time machine.

Definitions:

Meme song: The term meme wasn't in quite as much use as it is now, so they were referred to as internet jokes in most general circumstances. Meme songs in particular were a song with some popular joke connected to it, or were inherently funny at the time. During this time period, there were popular meme songs like: Rick Roll, troll song, peanut butter jelly time, numa numa, darude sandstorm, and the pedobear song (yes, that was a thing).


MLG: Short for Major League Gaming. Obviously this would interest kids that played shooter games, of which there were tons (the Xbox stereotype had to come from somewhere). The genuine interest in it was quickly diminished when MLG got massively commercialized. At some point, any MLG content would be covered in neon green and MTN Dew logos. Quickly, it got satirized and was used in exponentially ironic ways, to the point just about all "MLG" content was covered in CoD guns and hitmarkers, weed leaf pngs, snoop dogg, rainbow hypno frog gifs, and Doritos. It also was popular to use audio clips from the MLG compilation videos - which were just a modified version of the previously mentioned kill compilations, but with more "attitude" - that were being made at the time. The combination of these, plus whatever random content the uploader wanted to use that day (which was Shrek a surprising amount of the time), created an overloading mess of colors and sounds.


And now you know how Propane Nightmares is connected to the current hyper ironic internet, Shrek, and why you can blame MLG for ruining humor. Very important stuff to know.


There will be a test.

Quick edit: The people mad that a long comment exists on a song obviously have failed the aforementioned test. I'd suggest they should try enjoying the song instead of getting worked up that someone else made something that'll take an incredibly insignificant amount of energy to ignore. I know I enjoyed listening to the song, and everyone should focus on what they enjoy.

GooseMan

which references should we use to prepare for the test

JOHNPAUL KUN

Didn't read it all but thanks

「Za Verso」

damn its actually been so long that some people have never seen MLG

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