Genre not found
Artist not found
Album not found
Song not found

A Lannister Always Pays His Debts
Ramin Djawadi Lyrics


Jump to: Overall Meaning ↴  Line by Line Meaning ↴

And who are you, the proud lord said,
that I must bow so low?
Only a cat of a different coat,
that's all the truth I know.
In a coat of gold or a coat of red,
a lion still has claws,
And mine are long and sharp, my Lord,
as long and sharp as yours.
And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o'er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes, now the rains weep o'er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.
And who are you, the proud lord said,
that I must bow so low?
Only a cat of a different coat,
that's all the truth I know.
In a coat of gold or a coat of red,
a lion still has claws,
And mine are long and sharp, my lord,
as long and sharp as yours.
And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o'er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes, now the rains weep o'er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.

Overall Meaning

The lyrics to Ramin Djawadi's "A Lannister Always Pays His Debts" can be interpreted as a conversation between two lords, one of whom is questioning the other's loyalty and position of power. The first lord asks "And who are you, the proud lord said, that I must bow so low?" which indicates that he believes himself to be above the second lord. However, the second lord responds with "Only a cat of a different coat, that's all the truth I know," suggesting that he may appear weaker or more insignificant but still possesses the strength and cunning of a lion.


The phrase "a lion still has claws" reinforces the idea that even those who seem weaker can be just as dangerous and powerful as those who appear to be stronger. The repetition of the verses and chorus represents a cycle of power and control, as the first lord questions and underestimates the second lord, only to be met with a reminder of the second lord's true strength and power.


The final verse serves as a grim reminder of the consequences of underestimating someone's power, as the lord of Castamere is now gone, and his once-grand hall has been reduced to ruins. The imagery of the weeping rain adds to the melancholic tone of the song, emphasizing the finality of the lord's downfall.


Overall, the lyrics of "A Lannister Always Pays His Debts" explore themes of power, loyalty, and the dangers of underestimating those who may appear weaker. It serves as a cautionary tale about the consequences of arrogance and the importance of recognizing the strength and resiliency of others.


Line by Line Meaning

And who are you, the proud lord said,
The lord inquires about the identity of the person he is addressing.


that I must bow so low?
The lord questions why he should show respect to the person he is addressing.


Only a cat of a different coat,
The person being addressed is stating that they are not the person the lord thinks they are.


that's all the truth I know.
The person being addressed is saying that they are not lying and only telling the truth.


In a coat of gold or a coat of red, a lion still has claws,
The person being addressed is saying that regardless of their outward appearance, they are still a powerful and dangerous person.


And mine are long and sharp, my Lord, as long and sharp as yours.
The person being addressed is stating that they are just as powerful and dangerous as the lord they are speaking to.


And so he spoke, and so he spoke, that lord of Castamere,
The song is referring to a lord from Castamere who is speaking.


But now the rains weep o'er his hall, with no one there to hear.
The lord from Castamere's hall is now abandoned and forgotten, left to be destroyed by the weather.


Yes, now the rains weep o'er his hall, and not a soul to hear.
The destruction of the lord's hall is now being reiterated, emphasizing that there is no one around to witness it.


And who are you, the proud lord said,
The lord is repeating his inquiry about the person he is addressing.


that I must bow so low?
The lord is questioning his need to show respect to the person he is addressing.


Only a cat of a different coat,
The person being addressed repeats their earlier statement of not being who the lord thinks they are.


that's all the truth I know.
The person being addressed is still insisting that they are being truthful.


In a coat of gold or a coat of red, a lion still has claws,
The person being addressed is repeating their earlier statement that regardless of appearance, they are still a dangerous person.


And mine are long and sharp, my lord, as long and sharp as yours.
The person being addressed is still stating that they are just as powerful and dangerous as the lord they are speaking to.


And so he spoke, and so he spoke, that lord of Castamere,
The song again refers to the lord from Castamere speaking.


But now the rains weep o'er his hall, with no one there to hear.
The song repeats the image of the lord's deserted and destroyed hall.


Yes, now the rains weep o'er his hall, and not a soul to hear.
The image of the lonely, forgotten hall is conveyed once again.




Contributed by Asher E. Suggest a correction in the comments below.
To comment on or correct specific content, highlight it

Most interesting comments from YouTube:

@GerardBeaubrun

“A Lannister always pays his debt”, as a theme is one of the most cleverly penned tour de force from Ramin Djawadi but clearly one of the most deceptive and intentionally ambivalent.

Consider a viewer who happens to stumble upon the Third Season of Game of Throne, not knowing anything about the difference the Lannister’s sinister and strategic backstory. This specific theme seems to enter at moment where members of Lannister clan are confronted with a reality where despite the exhibited nastiness, they are compelled to ask in a way that honor the concept of legacy. In this viewer’s eye moment’s like the one starting at 0:51 clearly sound heroic.
The coming together of the orchestra words beautifully to fully express the tragic nature of these moments. As the theme ends at 2:35 that viewers is gripped by a sense of the unfinished, confronted with the fact that the Lannister’s reign is precarious and praying that its strong foundation do not crumble from within.

Now for the viewer who has seen the machinations of this morally wayward family the looming introduction with the heavy cello and bass is fitting. This family’s double standards have made Tyrion, the true strategic heir of this dynasty and the only one who suffers from the anti Lannisteresque emotion of fairness, a tragic and affable character. For this viewer. It is not surprising that the beautiful almost ethereal contrapuntal portion of the song starting at 0:51 yields to the brutal drum oriented war ballad fully developed at 1:11.
For this viewer, the blood stained rains of Castamere cleverly taint even the most beautiful portions of this piece. 1:565 in that perspective almost plays like the theme for a just but brutal quest of retribution.

Yes there is beauty in this family’s desire to stay on top, yes there is strength in that superhuman focus but it is maniacal for whoever venture himself or herself in the Lannister accepts or readily embraces harm and obliteration.

Despite all views on this family one thing certain. The nice string sliding from one heroic chord to a rousing one in 1:56 reminds us of not only their might but the herculean enterprise they’ve given themselves to. They are truly formidable, cunning and the listener cannot help almost standing in awe before their drive.

The almost emotional reinstatement of the theme at 2:19 suggest in truth that if this family doesn’t come together it is bound to fall. It is almost a 4th wall cry, an earnest urge to the Lannisters to come together and combine forces in fairness, compassion if not for the world simply for themselves. The theme ends almost in an unfinished tone.

The fate of this powerful, ambitious and flawed dynasty as the theme demonstrate is shrouded in uncertainty woven by threads mystery, passions, ambitions, pettiness and inner strength. What will prevail?



@Zhinarkos

xXxallyexXx I say decent, because in this universe, or rather in real life, there are no "good" people in my view. Nor actually bad ones either. You get good people acting selfishly and bad people acting unselfishly from time to time.

Everything that we do, especially when it comes to social interactions, is always subjective. It's quite easy to realize this if you are in a relationship (love or friendship) with someone, and that someone is currently angry at you for something. You picture a discussion in your head, what to say and what not to say, and realize, that there is no way you can be completely on their side. Or even be objective. There is always some point of view to interpret your actions from, some special question or an idea of a motive, that turns what you are trying to do seem like a bad thing. Even shutting up can be interpreted as a sign of betrayal.

There really is no such thing as this weird "peace of mind" between two people.

What it boils down to is trust. And how trust is gained boils down to actions, how to behave around people, what to say to them. How close your morals and ideas are with theirs.

And when it comes to love and caring, I see it as a way of accepting someone. Not parts of someone, but just as the person is. Faults and everything. That's the problem with caring in many relationships. You just care, no matter how he or she behaves. They can destroy the world, and still you'd care.

We all have our limits of morality, but sadly those limits are quite easily stretched. Law isn't morality, for a good reason. So when we ourselves start to judge other people's actions, it's as ridiculously subjective as their actions have been. "He has to take responsibility for what he has done. Is it his responsibility completely? Who's responsibility is it then? Surely not mine, I had nothing to do with it."

Tyrion does what he does, because he is who he is. You could say that "he is a good man", but that isn't exactly true, is it? On the other hand, if you accept him enough, and your morality is flexible, then maybe he is a good man. Doesn't really matter. That compilation of different shades of grey that makes him Tyrion Lannister is why people, including me, like this character.

Awfully long post to say that it's a matter of opinion. Of course you are entitled to an opinion as much as anyone else.



All comments from YouTube:

@p-ball_from_SEA

A Beautiful song for weddings, don't you agree?

@superfunny153

+Professor Pyro Class of 89 I will have it on mine to see how many people start panicking

@anthero4816

just for that massacare wedding night in got.

@BatPierrot

+P-Ball That Mofo from South-East Asia Despite this being the Rains of Castamere song, the track is more about Jaime's hidden heroism. This music is actually about the good there is in the Lannister family.

@burnedpotatoes195

+P-Ball That Mofo from South-East Asia

Oh yeah..

@godblessbharat708

Yup where people get killed :0

59 More Replies...

@snappycruise

Jaime : "A Lannister always..."
Broon : "Don't fooking say it!"

@contango7411

Lol

@Mr_Kian_Kane

"Don't say it, don't fooking say it!"

@amankaushal4124

🐘⃢⃢🦧⃢🦘⃢🐁⃢🦄⃢🐓⃢🐎

More Comments

More Versions