My Hometown
Bruce Springsteen Lyrics


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I was eight years old
And running with a dime in my hand
To the bus stop to pick
Up a paper for my old man
I'd sit on his lap in that big old Buick
And steer as we drove through town
He'd tousle my hair
And say, "Son, take a good look around"
This is your hometown
This is your hometown
This is your hometown
This is your hometown"

In '65 tension was running high
At my high school
There was a lot of fights
Between the black and white
There was nothing you could do
Two cars at a light on a Saturday night
In the back seat there was a gun
Words were passed in a shotgun blast
Troubled times had come
To my hometown
To my hometown
To my hometown
To my hometown

Now Main Street's whitewashed windows
And vacant stores
Seems like there ain't nobody
Wants to come down here no more
They're closing down the textile mill
Across the railroad tracks
Foreman says, "These jobs are going, boys
And they ain't coming back
To your hometown
To your hometown
To your hometown
To your hometown"

Last night me and Kate we laid in bed
Talking about getting out
Packing up our bags, maybe heading south
I'm thirty-five, we got a boy of our own now
Last night I sat him up behind the wheel




And said, "Son, take a good look around
This is your hometown"

Overall Meaning

Bruce Springsteen's "My Hometown" is a nostalgic, introspective song that looks back on the singer's boyhood in Freehold, New Jersey, as well as reflecting on the broader state of the town and the nation. The first stanza serves to establish the singer's personal relationship to the town, as he recalls running errands for his father and riding in his Buick. The images of father and son together in the car are deeply symbolic, representing a relationship between two generations and their shared love for the town.


However, the idyllic picture is soon shattered when Springsteen's narrator reflects on the racial tensions that were simmering in the town in the mid-1960s. This was a time of great upheaval in America, as civil rights demonstrations and riots were spreading across the country. Springsteen imbues these events with a sense of personal significance, evoking the sense of helplessness that he felt as a young boy witnessing the conflict from the sidelines.


The final stanza represents a culmination of this nostalgia and reflection, where Springsteen's narrator reflects on his own adult life and aspirations. He talks about laying in bed with his partner Kate and dreaming of leaving the town, seeking a better life for himself and his family. However, the song takes on a more melancholic tone as he realizes that his hometown will always be a part of him, and that he must pass these values and traditions on to his own son.


Line by Line Meaning

I was eight years old
The singer is recalling a specific moment from their childhood


And running with a dime in my hand
The singer was on their way to buy a newspaper for their father


To the bus stop to pick
The singer was going to the bus stop to catch a bus


Up a paper for my old man
The newspaper was for the artist's father


I'd sit on his lap in that big old Buick
The artist and their father would travel in a large old car together


And steer as we drove through town
The singer would pretend to drive the car with their father's help


He'd tousle my hair
The father would playfully ruffle the singer's hair


And say, "son, take a good look around"
The father was encouraging the artist to appreciate their surroundings


This is your hometown
The father was indicating that the town was special to the artist


In '65 tension was running high
The artist is recalling a year when there was a lot of tension in their town


At my high school
The tensions were particularly noticeable at the singer's high school


There was a lot of fights
There were frequent physical altercations


Between the black and white
The altercations often occurred between people of different races


There was nothing you could do
The singer and others felt powerless to stop the violence


Two cars at a light on a Saturday night
The singer is recalling a specific incident involving two cars at a traffic light


In the back seat there was a gun
One of the cars contained a gun in the back seat


Words were passed in a shotgun blast
One of the people in the cars fired the gun, causing more violence


Troubled times had come
The singer saw this violence as a sign of difficult times


Now Main Street's whitewashed windows
The singer is describing how the town looks now


And vacant stores
Many of the stores in town are now empty


Seems like there ain't nobody
Few people seem to want to come to this town


Wants to come down here no more
People don't want to visit or live in the town anymore


They're closing down the textile mill
A major local business is closing down


Across the railroad tracks
The business is located across from the railroad tracks


Foreman says, "these jobs are going, boys
The managers of the business are laying off workers


And they ain't coming back
The singer realizes that the jobs and the town's prosperity are gone for good


Last night me and Kate we laid in bed
The singer is recalling a conversation they had with their partner


Talking about getting out
The artist and their partner discussed leaving the town


Packing up our bags, maybe heading south
The artist and their partner considered moving to another part of the country


I'm thirty-five, we got a boy of our own now
The singer is older now and has a child of their own


Last night I sat him up behind the wheel
The singer is describing a moment when they sat their child in a car


And said, "son, take a good look around
The artist is telling their child to appreciate the town they live in


This is your hometown"
The artist is trying to pass on an appreciation for their hometown to their child




Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Written by: Bruce Springsteen

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

@spacydk

"My Hometown"

I was eight years old and running with a dime in my hand
Into the bus stop to pick up a paper for my old man
I'd sit on his lap in that big old Buick and steer as we drove through town
He'd tousle my hair and say son take a good look around this is your hometown
This is your hometown
This is your hometown
This is your hometown

In '65 tension was running high at my high school
There was a lot of fights between the black and white
There was nothing you could do
Two cars at a light on a Saturday night in the back seat there was a gun
Words were passed in a shotgun blast
Troubled times had come to my hometown
My hometown
My hometown
My hometown

Now Main Street's whitewashed windows and vacant stores
Seems like there ain't nobody wants to come down here no more
They're closing down the textile mill across the railroad tracks
Foreman says these jobs are going boys and they ain't coming back to your hometown
Your hometown
Your hometown
Your hometown

Last night me and Kate we laid in bed
talking about getting out
Packing up our bags maybe heading south
I'm thirty-five we got a boy of our own now
Last night I sat him up behind the wheel and said son take a good look around
This is your hometown



All comments from YouTube:

@rossmorebaz

If you ever wondered why they call him " The Boss" .. when he lifts the mic and the audience responds in perfect synchronicity ..Bruce just takes them home ... its beyond beautiful

@gsxrpx

Absolutely 100% agree. Well said, this is exactly why he's the boss

@hellesveistrup9516

hope he will paly 9 of juli in my hometowm

@H-mv2jp

Beware scammers. I have only been listening to Bruce for 6 months. I am now 75. a year older than the Boss. I have made a concentrated study of his career and l can’t believe what l have missed. To say that l am now a fan puts it mildly. I listen to him every day and am devastated that l am not able to go to a concert. But there are lots of things l can’t do now and l accept my limitations. I thank from my heart all those dedicated fans who have posted clips or full concerts over the years. They bring me great pleasure. He deserves his nickname. There is no-one like him.❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

@elvisgrigolo8841

Nunca é tarde para apreciar boa música meu amigo

@Pamjpat1

😊😊

@Pamjpat1

😊

@H-mv2jp

@@elvisgrigolo8841 😊

@BirgitIrmsccher-wo6se

Wenn ich ihn höre,werde ich fast bewusstlos.
Früher habe ich immer gelacht ,wenn junge Mädchen bei Musik umfallen.
Heut kann ich das voll nach empfinden
Ich bin einfach froh ,daß es Menschen gibt,die einen so bereichern
Vielen Dank!!!!❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

21 More Replies...

@terezamajerova4504

This song makes me cry. It is so powerful.

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