That'll Be The Day
Buddy Holly Lyrics


Well, that'll be the day, when you say goodbye
Yes, that'll be the day, when you make me cry
You say you're gonna leave, you know it's a lie
'Cause that'll be the day when I die

Well, you give me all your loving and your turtle doving
All your hugs and kisses and your money too
Well, you know you love me baby, until you tell me, maybe
That some day, well I'll be through
Well, that'll be the day, when you say goodbye
Yes, that'll be the day, when you make me cry
You say you're gonna leave, you know it's a lie
'Cause that'll be the day when I die

Well, that'll be the day, when you say goodbye
Yes, that'll be the day, when you make me cry
You say you're gonna leave, you know it's a lie
'Cause that'll be the day when I die

Well, when Cupid shot his dart he shot it at your heart
So if we ever part and I leave you
You sit and hold me and you tell me boldly
That some day, well I'll be blue

Well, that'll be the day, when you say goodbye
Yes, that'll be the day, when you make me cry
You say you're gonna leave, you know it's a lie
'Cause that'll be the day when I die

Well, that'll be the day, hoo-hoo
Well, that'll be the day, hoo-hoo
Well, that'll be the day, hoo-hoo
Well, that'll be the day

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing
Written by: Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, Norman Petty

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Comments from YouTube:

bhollyfan hardin

i really like the guitar playing on this version recorded in 1956 and this in Buddy Holly playing lead guitar i always thought it was Sonny Curtis playing lead but in a recent interview with Sonny he said Buddy played all the lead guitar on this song while he played rhythm guitar............

Bert

I LOVE BOTH VERSIONS!

5.56x45mm

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James Dunne

Nashville hadn’t a clue how to record Rock “n” Roll back in 1956, and Owen Bradley believed to have said that “that’ll be the day” was the worst song he’d ever heard. In January ‘57, a newer version was recorded in Clovis, New Mexico by an unknown group called “The Crickets” and it became a million seller towards the the end of 1957.Nashville on the other hand, later got wind of the fact that it was Buddy Holly who was fronting the Crickets. feathers must’ve hit the fan in the offices of Nashville bigwigs because they didn’t renew Holly’s contract and dropped him from the label, what did they do? they rushed released Buddy’s previous Nashville recordings and tried to cash in on his name. Goes to show there were wolves in the record industry, and they still exist!!!

Leslie Kelley

I actually like this version than the version that was a hit.

Herbert

@FiendishPickle - Indeed, this is rockabilly.

FiendishPickle

It has a rawness that the other version lacks.

David Rotter

He actually performed a more "quintessential" vocal take on the Brunswick version, almost like between the two, he had perfected the various inflections that he would surely employ for the 1957 sessions. The Brunswick version doesn't have the same "Prominent Slapback Echo" nor as much "Hillbilly" in the Vocal like this has. Another interesting thing about this earlier take is his Guitar playing.... He seemed to already know how he wanted the song to be arranged, but on this take, he plays a bit more and again, it seems as though he went through the same process that helped to transform the Vocal... There's absolutely no question as to his utter brilliance as a Songwriter, Producer and Musician. This was the 50s, no boutique amplifiers, no pedals, no custom strings, no stereo although he did record overdubs.... Just a Stratocaster and a Fender Amp.... Amazing!

Herbert

Good, thoughtful synopsis. The hillbilly quotient is what does it for me. This version is mountain dew, the latter version is bottled pop.

Montgomery Denzer

Man they had IT

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