Ohio
Crosby Stills Nash & Young Lyrics


Tin soldiers and Nixon's coming
We're finally on our own
This summer I hear the drumming
Four dead in Ohio

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground?
How can you run when you know?

Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago
What if you knew her
And found her dead on the ground
How can you run when you know?

Tin soldiers and Nixon's coming
We're finally on our own
This summer I hear the drumming
Four dead in Ohio
Four dead in Ohio (four dead)
Four dead in Ohio (four)
Four dead in Ohio
Four dead in Ohio (how many more?)
Four dead in Ohio (why?)
Four dead in Ohio (oh)
Four dead in Ohio (oh)
Four dead in Ohio (why?)
Four dead in Ohio (why?)
Four dead in Ohio (why?)
Four dead in Ohio

Lyrics © Broken Arrow Music, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., WORDS & MUSIC A DIV OF BIG DEAL MUSIC LLC
Written by: Neil Young

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

jim northrop

Almost fifty years after this era, i continue to feel such anger at this vain and futile sacrifice of a country’s most precious asset - it’s young. We lost 50,000 of my brothers and sisters on the battlefields of VietNam.

We were drafted for two years to fight a pointless war. We were barely in our 20’s, but we were children taught to become killers.

After a tour of duty in Nam, we were rotated to Germany,etc. I heard so many stories of those who chose to shoot themselves in their own leg or feet, so they could be taken home, away from all that madness.

This tribute for those students who were murdered by our own troops on that Ohio university field expresses my feelings exactly. Four more who died at the hands of madmen who ran a supposedly democratic country.

Yet, all these sacrifices - all these lessons - have been lost on America’s current leaders.



bluskies1000

I believe only volunteers had more than one tour in Viet Nam. Draftees served only two years.
Lol. I was skipped by the Draft, and felt like I was shirking civic duty, so I was among the early volunteers of the All Volunteer Military. The ironic part, as a trusted volunteer, with sensitive duties, I was considered to valuable to waste, and was never allowed in a combat zone!
This was during the 5 year transition from draft to all volunteer. Draftees were catatonic, Commonly observed symptoms include:
Stupor - inability to move, speak or respond to stimuli
Lack of verbal response
Agitation
Mutism
Hide's when possible
.... the most useless people, generally speaking, putting all work and danger on your back, it was a relief to see them gone and decent smart people take their place.



Stonewall

I learned of WWII as a young child from Sunday Morning PBS programing. "The World at War". Thames Productions. I was enthralled. Around the same time, (1964), America was embarking into Vietnam. I watched the Vietnam War from the beginning, every night on the evening news (Huntly-Brinkly, Cronkite), as a young child. I had faith in the American Government that they would not call it's young men to put themselves in harms way except in dire circumstances. As I watched the war in Vietnam progress, I became more skeptical of this notion.
Kent State taught me that our government will kill our own people if they don't adhere to current political doctrine.
We as Americans are in dire straights, (great band), today.
Our freedom is at stake.
Many have died for it.
We must never surrender our liberty.
Good vs. Evil.
Always remember, The Good Lord will prevail.
God Bless You All.



All comments from YouTube:

Mary Steffens

This song still gives me chills. I remember that afternoon like yesterday. Amazing that we survived that era and unfortunately didn't learn much!!!

maf5454

So do I my sister. May 4,1970, one hell of a birthday present huh? I turned 16 that terrible day and was forever changed. I was taught by my folks, teachers and other public officials that the military would never turn their weapons on civilians and murder them. I guess this proves that wasn't true. I saw it on the evening news cast and couldn't believe what had happened. I remember looking over at my Mom and asking, "Mom what did those people do to those soldiers?" She looked back at me and took a big breath and said " baby child (I was her youngest) I don't know" I also asked her the question "what will happen to those soldiers, didn't they just kill people for protesting the war?" One more time a big breath and she said "yes they did, but they are soldiers and someone gave them an order". I ask her "then would the man who gave the order be in trouble?" She looked at me and said "probably not". Then I remember getting real angry and said "why not, all of those soldiers killed those people and that is wrong" There was more conversation but she was right, to this day 52 years later not one person has been held responsible for those murders, not one. Those people were exercising their First Amendment rights " the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances". That day I became and antiwar protester and was forever changed. Thanks Mom you did your best in a really tough situation with a kid that was just starting to become aware, RIP you earned it.
Thanks for reading my ramble. Be well and safe, peace to you and yours.

John Allen

My buddy called me and said I should listen to this song again. Thank you for writing it Neil. There's pictures of us all over the internet, you can see it at 0:16 in "The Day the '60s died." Bill is a tall guy with kind of bushy hair wearing a black leather jacket. I'm right in front of him taking a drag off my cigarette and I'm wearing a purple fringe suede jacket. In the very front, between a girl and a guy in a gas mask, is our buddy Todd. He's giving the National Guard the finger. He made the cover of Look magazine with a picture of him throwing a tear gas cannister back at the NG. This was before they opened fire on us. That morning they rang the liberty bell and there was a ceremonial burying of the US Constitution because Nixon was trampling all over it. A few hours later, a general riding in an open air jeep zig-zagged back and forth across the commons saying , "Return to your domiciles immediately" over a scratchy megaphone. They had tanks and halftracks and guns and we wanted THEM off campus immediately. We were really mad. Nixon had won the election by promising to get us out of Vietnam and then he makes a speech saying we were invading (he said it was an "incursion") Cambodia and widening the war! So that's what kicked the protests off to begin with. We just sat down in the middle of Route 534, a major road, stopping traffic in both directions. They sent a big helicopter to hover right over top of us and there was a lot of heavy prop wash. The night before quite a few store windows were smashed downtown (which I tried to stop) and somebody set fire to the hated wooden ROTC building the next night right off the commons. I heard they trained future officers for Vietnam there and that they were biological warfare experts. So after the general the NG just started slowly marching across the commons. We were on the other side yelling for them to get off campus. As they got closer we started backing up the little hill behind the commons and the liberty bell. I saw a few people throwing rocks when the NG got closer to us. None of us, not even in our wildest imagination, ever thought the NG would shoot at us with their guns. Some people said their guns weren't even loaded. It was common back then to see the NG all the time at things like labor strikes and there was never any shooting. We were exercising our 1st Amendment right to protest. My dorm was at the top of the hill so when we backed up there I ducked in the entryway. Other people started down the hill on the other side. The NG passed where I was and followed the crowd and then opened fire. I saw people hitting the ground. At first we didn't realize what had just happened. Then we were in total shock and people were trying to help the ones who were hit. You could smell the gunpowder in the air. At the same time the Guard was retreating slowly in disarray. We started following them as they backed off until we all just sat down next to the liberty bell in defiance. Most of us were ready to die if that's what it took. That was when the professor came out and started telling us we had to leave or they were going to slaughter us. He was crying and very compelling. So we got up and started walking away. The rest is in the history books. My roommate's girlfriend, Allison Krause, was one of the people killed. None of the NG was ever indicted for the killings but 25 students were indicted. My Dad and I had discussed what we were going to do if I was indicted and we pretty much agreed that I would sneak into Canada and try to keep a low profile. My Dad was a former FBI agent and I'm sure there were times when he was totally baffled by my reasons for being a part of a counter-culture movement. But he supported and loved me no matter what I did. I've lived in northern California near the redwoods and Mt. Shasta for the last 40 years and Bill lives in the beautiful Atlanta, Georgia area, so we decided to meet up at Kent on the 50th anniversary. They've got a memorial there now where you can learn about what happened, why, and what we can do in the future to prevent it from happening again. There is a plaque from the National Registry of Historic Places marking the event. The exact spots where people were killed in the parking lot are outlined in black paint. Immediately after the killings about a hundred and some colleges shut down across the country, the students at Jackson State were killed and about a million people showed up in Washington, DC, and another million in NYC to continue the struggle. After that I left Ohio and moved to the desert in Arizona where I stayed for the next 7 years. Nixon finally ended the war in Vietnam. What happened on May 4th, 1970 has had a profound effect on my life. Like Jimi Hendrix said, "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will be at peace."

Mark Jenner

That was a very moving story I was only six years old living in the uk and knew nothing about this untill years later it's shocking that some thing like this could ever take place in a civalised place like the USA a place I have visited with my wife to see my sister in law and brother in law

Backinblack Bunny

Did you call for peace after 9/11 or did you send your kids, like my 17yo husband, to unleash the dogs of war on innocent children just like America did in Vietnam?

Val Sperl

@Orkëo Swaarte no need to apologize, I hate anything to do with any war! I hate that the US has to get involved, ever. Growing up I remember almost every family I knew lost someone in Vietnam and it broke my heart that anyone had to die in a war or in protest of it. It's ugly, it's wrong on every level and we all get very emotional. When I watched the video and read the story, I was horrified. I was too young when that protest happened. I do remember when the vets came back though. People spit on them, threw things at them and said some pretty ugly things. I remember thinking, wait these guys were forced to go over there and were put through hell and back, for their government, their country and for their families and everyone else back home here to be "free," is what they're told. I was confused and thought how horrible. And even today so many come back from wars that are not theirs and are minus a leg, an arm or half their brain, for what? Freedom? We are not free. Crap, we have to watch everything we say! And when your old and have called a girl a girl and a boy a boy for 65-80 years, it's so ingrained in your brain that it's habit. And you have to stop every sentence now and think oh, what am I supposed to say? At this age you forgot what you were even talking about to begin with, by the time you form the proper sentence! I respect all humans for whomever they are, for whatever their dreams may be, however they choose to live. And life is a struggle, it's ugly, it's mean and sometimes you wonder, what's it all for? Then you see the sun come out, trees turning green again, the flowers blooming and your neighbors adorable little smiling baby and you have to say (or convince yourself) ok, this is the beauty in life. And when your bones hurt, you've lost everyone in your family now and it feels like you don't want to be here sometimes, you remember, life is a struggle, but if you get up on a rainy day and are grateful the flowers are getting watered and find something everyday to be grateful for, it becomes bearable again. I'm sorry for your bad memories. Try not to ever let your anger and bad memories over shadow the love and the good memories you have in life. May we have peace in our hearts forever.☮️♥️☮️ And music that touches our souls.🎶🎶🎶
PS: your English was fine, your frustrations understood, and I didn't mean to get technical on a sensitive subject. ☮️♥️🎶

Orkëo Swaarte

@Val Sperl You are right, the blame should also be spread on the other three starting from Kennedy, I know well that the presidents involved in this war were four, and how and why the US got involved in that war. In my country, the Vietnam War was considered the Nixon War because he was, not without reason, particularly detested in mine and in other countries, due to the fact that, despite having promised to end the war, he had given the way to a further escalation by continuing and intensifying the bombings initiated by Johnson on North Vietnam, and on Laos a neutral state, and starting in 1969 on Cambodia. As you well know, more bombs will be dropped by order of Nixon than in all previous war years, apparently three times the number of bombs dropped throughout World War II. Not to mention all the other usual and endless crap that occurred during that war and also in other parts of the world, always during his administration, things like the coup in Chile, or Operation Condor and other filth that came up in those years. . The echo of the events of Kent State University contributed enormously among us guys who were demonstrating against that war at the time, to put the "Made in Nixon" on that war and everything connected with it, I realize I used a term that I used then , motivated by anger towards that executioner, but reviewing the images of the KSU makes me angry and saddens me even now, we protested against the same war, on different continents, I consider them brothers. This explains why, although it is wrong from a historical point of view, you are absolutely right, I and many others remember that of Vietnam, more viscerally as the "Nixon war", the war of the worst, as it was considered then in those moments. I say then because we could not imagine the caliber of successive presidents so I would love to be able to say "it's your business", but that's not the case, it's not just your business, unfortunately the United States has always Influenced and always will, with good luck or the bad ones, the politics of other countries, including mine. I apologize for my patchy English, but I haven't spoken it in years.

Val Sperl

@Orkëo Swaarte if you Google how many presidents served during the Vietnam War, it was four. Nixon was the one to get us out of the war according to google. Why would you say it was Nixon's dirty war? I think you need to take a look at the facts stated before you blame one person. I'm not a Nixon fan by any means but please look up this info. Thank you

35 More Replies...

jim northrop

Almost fifty years after this era, i continue to feel such anger at this vain and futile sacrifice of a country’s most precious asset - it’s young. We lost 50,000 of my brothers and sisters on the battlefields of VietNam.

We were drafted for two years to fight a pointless war. We were barely in our 20’s, but we were children taught to become killers.

After a tour of duty in Nam, we were rotated to Germany,etc. I heard so many stories of those who chose to shoot themselves in their own leg or feet, so they could be taken home, away from all that madness.

This tribute for those students who were murdered by our own troops on that Ohio university field expresses my feelings exactly. Four more who died at the hands of madmen who ran a supposedly democratic country.

Yet, all these sacrifices - all these lessons - have been lost on America’s current leaders.

Michael Vance

I like to listen to the grateful dead etc. And mix it up with black metal ;; ! Im sorry but peace does come with a PRICE!. WE GOTTA MAKE IT SO THE RICH ARE THE ONES ON THE GROUND DURING WAR! NOT IN A POSITION OF COMMAND!!!!

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