Contact
Daft Punk Lyrics


Hey Bob I'm looking at what Jack was talking about
And it's definitely not a particle that's nearby
It is a bright object and it's obviously rotating because it's flashing
It's way out in the distance, certainly rotating in a very rhythmic fashion
Because the flashes come around almost on time

As we look back at the earth it's up at about 11 o'clock
About maybe ten or twelve diameters
I don't know whether that does you any good
But there's something out there

Lyrics © CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC
Written by: Guillaume Emmanuel Paul Homem Christo, Stephane Queme, Thomas Bangalter, Garth Ivan Richard Porter, Tony Mitchell, Daryl Braithwaite

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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

PopukoFan

So, from what I've read about the monumental undertaking that was the production of this album, I can completely understand why Daft Punk never tried to tour it or follow up quickly on its success. The whole story of RAM's production is like something out of a dream or a legend.

From some interviews the two gave, I found out that when they were in the early stages of brainstorming Thomas and Guy-Man felt the odds were completely against them -- they did not know if they could make a good or great album. After all, they were roughly 20 years old as a band and few bands can put out something good, let alone something great by that time. So they had to come to terms with the possibility that nobody would like this album pretty early on while also finding a way to break the curse of making a bad album as an older band. This is what led them to experiment with their sound in RAM.

Eventually, the two settled on the idea of composing it entirely with live musicians to form something of an 'Ultimate Band', composed of anybody they could have possibly wanted. Daft Punk would go on to recruit Paul Williams, the composer and songwriter of their favorite movie, and the singer/songwriter of their favorite contemporary rock band: Julian Casablancas of The Strokes among others. The band brought on top audio talent to help them like Mick Guzauski (worked with Celine Dion, MJ, Madonna and more big names). Originally, they only brought on Nile Rodgers to get something for Get Lucky, but they were so pleased with his sound that they hired him long term. As a result, his guitar can be heard throughout the album. Nile's parts were recorded in the same studio that had recorded Jimi Hendrix's "Electric Ladyland", the first album the robots listened to as friends when they were schoolmates. Much of the songs were produced at very famous music studios, which had something of a morale boost on the older musicians that were recruited to play.

The group even contacted NASA and was given access to their mission recording archives. The band searched them and Thomas insisted on something involving Gene Cernan (the last man to walk the moon as of this writing) and that led to sample you can hear in the introduction of Contact. Remarkably enough, Pharrell Williams came up with and sang out the lyrics of Get Lucky while he was drunk partying out one night with Daft Punk. There's a ton more to it all, like them extensively interviewing Giorgio Moroder, one of their musical inspirations so they could make a song around his life's story or how Touch is such a touching song partially because it was inspired by the singer's gratefulness for every sober day he'd had after quitting alcohol or even how they kept the album's contents a secret even from Columbia Records. They literally just shipped out one copy for mass production at a factory.

In a GQ interview before Random Access Memories was released, the reporter mentioned how in Daft Arts (Daft Punk's secret recording studio), there was a big poster on the wall. It was of Earth. That photograph was probably the famous Blue Marble image and more importantly I think it perfectly describes what I think Daft Punk were going for with RAM. Daft Punk were trying to make something out of this world. They wanted to transcend people's expectations of them, their own expectations of themselves and the stale EDM sound of the time. Having won Album of the Year, can really anyone say they failed?

So there you have it. Random Access Memories is more than just an album. It is a success story, a story of personal growth featuring two people you would never have expected to be underdogs otherwise. That's not even mentioning the people who had their careers revitalized by this album like Pharrell and Nile. The final product here is a testament to creativity and a beacon of hope for artists whose works they too may not believe in as they struggle to reach their creative destination.

Thanks for coming to my TED talk. I have a playlist of all my favorite songs that I'll eventually finish curating and when I'm done I'll be overjoyed if the algorithm decides that it's worthy.



Altronza

@what ?
You've triggered, storytime.

Personally, I never referred to them as voices when I was younger (5 to 13(8 years) was how long my schizophrenia developed and lasted. It ended in a serious Tonic seizure and a lot of pain after a period of rapidly appearing micro seizures. My seizures are stiff with minimal twitches and loss of body part functions, I don't spazz).

At the time I thought they were normal and I would actively talk to them like people.

It's only after it's all over that I think one refers to them as "Voices in the head." It's straight to the point.

I've found it makes others even more uncomfortable to refer to them as something other than voices in your head. Even just mentioning a mental illness immediately makes most people tense up, reading micro-expressions on the regular makes it hard to share.
I mean. What else would one call them? Them, Yourself or selves, some names, personalities, when they aren't actually, yet appear to be?

Plus having hallucinations where you see them sometimes makes it a lot harder to identify them as just voices,
but, voices they were.

I'm not a psychologist, but I do know every mental illness is unique to an individual. This makes stories sound fake where the impossible may not have been for those affected. Voices, segregation of bodily functions and cognitive processes into personalities, hallucinations, disconnected speech and thought (Boy was that fun, I'd either sound like I'm speaking blubber, or like a computer with to the point words. Now I don't even get that, but just a sudden stop to my thoughts), and so on.

Alright there's my rant while listening to this epic song.
Feels good to talk about it, even if it's in small bits.

It sounds fake so I just tell everyone that it's a story.
Oh well, I turned out alright so maybe it was.
Who knows.



And yes it's possible to develop a mental illness at 5 or even younger, people seem to think they only develop after the trauma. Also the degree of how potent the symptoms are, because they ebb and flow.
That is my personal opinion and experience of the matter.
Also my response to "this seems so fake tho"



All comments from YouTube:

PopukoFan

So, from what I've read about the monumental undertaking that was the production of this album, I can completely understand why Daft Punk never tried to tour it or follow up quickly on its success. The whole story of RAM's production is like something out of a dream or a legend.

From some interviews the two gave, I found out that when they were in the early stages of brainstorming Thomas and Guy-Man felt the odds were completely against them -- they did not know if they could make a good or great album. After all, they were roughly 20 years old as a band and few bands can put out something good, let alone something great by that time. So they had to come to terms with the possibility that nobody would like this album pretty early on while also finding a way to break the curse of making a bad album as an older band. This is what led them to experiment with their sound in RAM.

Eventually, the two settled on the idea of composing it entirely with live musicians to form something of an 'Ultimate Band', composed of anybody they could have possibly wanted. Daft Punk would go on to recruit Paul Williams, the composer and songwriter of their favorite movie, and the singer/songwriter of their favorite contemporary rock band: Julian Casablancas of The Strokes among others. The band brought on top audio talent to help them like Mick Guzauski (worked with Celine Dion, MJ, Madonna and more big names). Originally, they only brought on Nile Rodgers to get something for Get Lucky, but they were so pleased with his sound that they hired him long term. As a result, his guitar can be heard throughout the album. Nile's parts were recorded in the same studio that had recorded Jimi Hendrix's "Electric Ladyland", the first album the robots listened to as friends when they were schoolmates. Much of the songs were produced at very famous music studios, which had something of a morale boost on the older musicians that were recruited to play.

The group even contacted NASA and was given access to their mission recording archives. The band searched them and Thomas insisted on something involving Gene Cernan (the last man to walk the moon as of this writing) and that led to sample you can hear in the introduction of Contact. Remarkably enough, Pharrell Williams came up with and sang out the lyrics of Get Lucky while he was drunk partying out one night with Daft Punk. There's a ton more to it all, like them extensively interviewing Giorgio Moroder, one of their musical inspirations so they could make a song around his life's story or how Touch is such a touching song partially because it was inspired by the singer's gratefulness for every sober day he'd had after quitting alcohol or even how they kept the album's contents a secret even from Columbia Records. They literally just shipped out one copy for mass production at a factory.

In a GQ interview before Random Access Memories was released, the reporter mentioned how in Daft Arts (Daft Punk's secret recording studio), there was a big poster on the wall. It was of Earth. That photograph was probably the famous Blue Marble image and more importantly I think it perfectly describes what I think Daft Punk were going for with RAM. Daft Punk were trying to make something out of this world. They wanted to transcend people's expectations of them, their own expectations of themselves and the stale EDM sound of the time. Having won Album of the Year, can really anyone say they failed?

So there you have it. Random Access Memories is more than just an album. It is a success story, a story of personal growth featuring two people you would never have expected to be underdogs otherwise. That's not even mentioning the people who had their careers revitalized by this album like Pharrell and Nile. The final product here is a testament to creativity and a beacon of hope for artists whose works they too may not believe in as they struggle to reach their creative destination.

Thanks for coming to my TED talk. I have a playlist of all my favorite songs that I'll eventually finish curating and when I'm done I'll be overjoyed if the algorithm decides that it's worthy.

Ian Kingston

Really goes to show they put not just their hearts and souls into this album but every bit of will power they had left, they knew this would be their last hurrah and they wanted to go out with a bang pulling out all the stops. And my god they went out with a bang with RAM.

redturboeg

Every single bit of this. Thank you for being the one who says this in such a well versed way.

111 234

Amazing!

Adi

This is my favourite comment on entire YouTube platform.

Dan's Jumping Videos

God tier comment to a God tier song.

91 More Replies...

BTTWRager910

This song gains another meaning now. 1993-FOREVER

Ashzad Mehboob

This is the best song of all time. E shh fake r s

afcasoli

1 a

Piekark

93 till infinity

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