Miner's Prayer
Dwight Yoakam Lyrics


When the whistle blows each morning
And I walk down in that cold, dark mine
I say a prayer to my dear Saviour
Please let me see the sunshine one more time

When oh when will it be over
When will I lay these burdens down
And when I die, dear Lord, in heaven
Please take my soul from 'neath that cold, dark ground
I still grieve for my poor brother
And I still hear my dear old mother cry
When late that night they came and told her
He'd lost his life down in the Big Shoal Mine

When oh when will it be over
When will I lay these burdens down
And when I die, dear Lord, in heaven
Please take my soul from 'neath that cold, dark ground

I have no shame, I feel no sorrow
If on this earth not much I own
I have the love of my sweet children
An old plow mule, a shovel and a hoe

When oh when will it be over
When will I lay these burdens down
And when I die, dear Lord, in heaven
Please take my soul from 'neath that cold, dark ground

Yeah when I die, dear Lord, in heaven
Please take my soul from 'neath that cold, dark ground

Lyrics © THE BICYCLE MUSIC COMPANY
Written by: DWIGHT YOAKAM

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Comments from YouTube:

pbruc brooks

Hillbilly music. Real Appalachia to a proud people

k dillon

Played this at my father's funeral... he was a teacher, developed educational curriculum & worked all over the world for USAID. However throughout his life he embraced his roots & shared with others the stories of his youth in Coalwood, McDowell County, West Virginia. As are most who hail from the coalfields of Southern Appalachia, my father was a truly remarkable human being & I, too, embrace & celebrate this heritage. Funny how the life force of those hills becomes inexorably intertwined in the very souls of those who are in any way connected to them. I can't explain it but ask any hillbilly & he'll likely as not tell you the same. The 1st time I heard this song, I recognized the same tie binding Dwight Yoakum as well. If you felt drawn to this song & crave more, listen to "Bury Me" (with remarkable backing vocals from Maria McKee). Peace 😎

So Flo ShaunD

I'm 40 years old and I grew up working in the coal mines and strip mines of eastern ky ... YESSS There is a tie that binds us all ! I live in southern Florida now , just got here back in oct. Who said we'd never leave Harlen alive !!!!!!!

ScotsLyon

K Dillion best comment on youtube ever sounds like a real man to be proud of

So Flo ShaunD

I remember when he usta walk up and down 23 with his guitar and Marlow told him he wasn't good enough to play there and he couldn't get a deal in Nashville either . He went to Bakersfield Cal and got hooked up with Buck and as the say the rest is history 💯 I lived in eastern ky. for 39 years. From the time I was born until last year

Nabob24

INSANE 🤘🤘🤘HALIFAX 87 and 91

Kelli Kallenborn

The Bakersfield Sound salutes Appalachia.

Jimmy Ray

God bless those hard working souls who dig the precious black dust. You keep America burning bright. Your the pilot lights of America!

C Williams

This is such an amazing song. My understanding is that Dwight wrote it for his grandfather Luther Gibbs. I dunno if it's the exact name of his grandfather but I'm thinking I might be. He was a coal miner from Pikeville. I'm babbling now. This song is a favorite of mine when I'm playing guitar. Great stuff

brad dovel

best song on the albulm

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