Makin' Whoopee
Frank Sinatra Lyrics


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Another bride, another June
Another sunny honeymoon
Another season, another reason
For makin' whoopee

A lot of shoes, a lot of rice
The groom is nervous, he answers twice
It's really killin' that he's so willin'
To make whoopee

Picture a little love nest
Down where the roses cling
Picture the same sweet love nest
And think what a year can bring

He's washin' dishes and baby clothes
He's so ambitious, he even sews
But don't forget folks, that's what you get folks
For makin' whoopee

Another bride, another June
Another sunny, a sunny honeymoon
Another reason is that season
For makin' whoopee

A mess of shoes, a gang of rice
The groom is nervous that he answers twice
It's really killin' this cat so willin'
To make whoopee

Now he's washin' dishes with those baby clothes
He's so ambitious, man, he even sews
But don't forget folks, that's what you get folks
For makin' whoopee





But don't forget folks, that's what you get folks
For makin' whoopee

Overall Meaning

The song "Makin' Whoopee" by Frank Sinatra is a classic tune that speaks about love, marriage and the realities that come along with the union. The lyrics are about the excitement of a wedding day, the honeymoon period and the aftermath of marriage. The first verse depicts the start of a new life journey for the newlyweds as they embark on their honeymoon and another season of love. The second verse speaks about the wedding ceremony with the imagery of shoes and rice, while also portraying the overwhelming emotions of the groom who answers twice.


The following verse describes the couple's future together, with the image of a love nest where they will build their home together and highlighting how quickly time flies. The final verse portrays the reality of marriage: the husband performing domestic chores such as washing dishes and clothes and being ambitious in his efforts to please his wife. The chorus reiterates that all of these things come with the territory of makin' whoopee.


Overall, the song captures the ups and downs of marriage, and how the reality can sometimes be different from the initial excitement.


Line by Line Meaning

Another bride, another June
Just another wedding in the month of June.


Another sunny honeymoon
A pleasant, cheerful vacation with the newlywed partner.


Another season, another reason
Weddings happen all the time, every season, and there is always a reason to get married.


For makin' whoopee
To have sex.


A lot of shoes, a lot of rice
Typical wedding tradition of throwing rice at the bride and groom and several shoes are worn to match the attire.


The groom is nervous, he answers twice
The groom is nervous and excited to proclaim his love and commitment to his new wife.


It's really killin' that he's so willin'
He is eager and willing to have sex with his new wife.


To make whoopee
To have sex.


Picture a little love nest
Imagine a cozy, comfortable home for the new couple.


Down where the roses cling
A romantic and picturesque location for the love nest.


Picture the same sweet love nest
The same love nest, but after a year of love and hard work.


And think what a year can bring
A lot can change in a year, imagine the progress or challenges the couple will face.


He's washin' dishes and baby clothes
The groom is willing to help with household chores and childcare.


He's so ambitious, he even sews
The groom is eager to be helpful and capable of learning new skills.


But don't forget folks, that's what you get folks
People often get too caught up in the excitement of weddings and forget the reality of committing to a lifelong partnership.


For makin' whoopee
The consequences of marriage include fulfilling sexual desires.


A mess of shoes, a gang of rice
A repeat of previous lyrics, emphasizing the traditional and predictable elements of a wedding.


The groom is nervous that he answers twice
The groom is still nervous and excited, even after the wedding ceremony.


It's really killin' this cat so willin'
The groom is eager and passionate about being intimate with his new wife.


To make whoopee
To have sex.


Now he's washin' dishes with those baby clothes
A repeat of previous lyrics, showing that the groom is still willing to help with household chores and childcare after the wedding.


He's so ambitious, man, he even sews
A repeat of previous lyrics, showing that the groom is willing and capable of fulfilling domestic duties.


But don't forget folks, that's what you get folks
A repeat of previous lyrics, reminding listeners of the reality and responsibility of marriage.


For makin' whoopee
A repeat of previous lyrics, emphasizing the sexual component of marriage.




Lyrics © DistroKid, DONALDSON PUBLISHING CO, TOBAGO MUSIC COMPANY, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Written by: Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Mike


on The Lady Is A Champ

eight

She gets too hungry for dinner at eight
She can't eat late and stay up all night, because unlike society types, she has to get up in the morning.

She likes the theatre and never comes late
She cares more about seeing the play than being seen making an entrance.

She never bothers with people she'd hate
Her friends are friends, not social trophies.

Doesn't like crap games with barons or earls
While barrns and earls probably don't play craps, she associates with friends, not people to be seen with.

Won't go to Harlem in ermine and pearls
She doesn't "slum", the practice of the rich in the 30's, when the song was written, of touring poor neighborhoods dressed in rich clothes to "tut, tut" about the deplorable conditions, and congratulate each other for "caring about the poor"

Won't dish the dirt with the rest of the girls
Doesn't trade gossip for acceptance among an in-crowd


She likes the free, fresh wind in her hair
She cares more about how her hair feels than conforming with current hair fashions

Hates California, it's cold and it's damp
Since most of California is noticeably warmer and / or drier than New York, where the play the song was written for is set, this is probably a facetious excuse to like what she likes.


And she won't go to Harlem in Lincoln's or Ford's
Another reference to slumming, but facetious, since Lincolns and Fords were middle-class, not luxury brands when the lyric was written

Anonymous


on Try a Little Tenderness

Here are the correct lyrics

Try A Little Tenderness - Frank Sinatra - Lyrics

Oh she may be weary
Women do get wearied
Wearing that same old shabby dress
And when she’s weary
You try a little tenderness

You know she’s waiting
Just anticipating things she’ll may never possess
While she is without them
Try just a little bit of tenderness

It’s not just sentimental
She has her grieve and her care
And the words that soft and gentle
Makes it easier to bear
You wont regret it
Women don't forget it
Love is their whole happiness
And it’s all so easy
Try a little tenderness

Musical Interlude

And, it’s all so easy
Try a little tenderness

Daniel


on The Way You Look Tonight

I met Frank Jr. in Las Vegas, a real gentleman. RIP you both.

Giorgi Khutashvili


on Theme from New York, New York

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