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String Quartet In C H.lll Op.76 No.3
Franz Joseph Haydn Lyrics


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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

Elaine Blackhurst

Martin Riley
Some muddled history in your comment.

To clarify:
Haydn had heard ‘God Save the King’ many times whilst in England between 1791 -1795; he was very moved by this first experience of a ‘national anthem’.

On his return to Austria, in short, he wrote a national song* for his own country, ‘Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser’, which was first performed in 1797.

Haydn’s Volkslied (people’s song) melody later became the German National anthem in 1922, and as is well known, remains so today; it was dropped by Austria in 1945 after some pressure from the Allies.

The melody has also been used as a hymn tune.

* I use the word ‘song’ in its correct Oxford English Dictionary meaning, not the horrible modern mutilation so widely mis-used across the world today where some think it can be used in place of the generic ‘work’ or ‘piece’, or the even more asinine usage instead of symphony, concerto, sonata, and so forth.



Elaine Blackhurst

Hawk Of light
Haydn was obviously playing the piano version and did indeed spend time playing around with the harmonies.

By 1809, he was extremely frail and housebound, but the context was the French invasion of Vienna.
Explosions had shaken Haydn’s house which left the old man seized with trembling and his servants frightened: ‘Children, don’t be frightened, for where Haydn is, no harm can come to you’, he told them.

He had already been visited by a French officer who very movingly, sang to him ‘In native worth’ from The Creation’; in truth, Haydn was living in a war zone with his city being invaded.

Haydn had heard ‘God save the King’ in England and seen its impact as a national song; he wrote ‘Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser’ - ie the famous melody of this quartet movement and now the German national anthem - as a patriotic people’s song for his own country.

The song came first, the quartet soon after.

Haydn did indeed call it a ‘Volkslied’ - people’s song - but he came to think of it as a sort of prayer; given the sound of cannon all around, it was obviously an appropriate piece to play.

On 26 May 1809, he played the Emperor’s Hymn three times over, took to his bed - which he never left - and died peacefully in his sleep soon after midnight on 31 May.

Hope that explains Why?



All comments from YouTube:

Fátima Estrada

0:00 Allegro
6:57 Poco adagio: Cantabile
13:22 Minueto
17:48 Finale: Presto

luigi polletti

0lp

Max Sauter

mein klassenkamerad is netto

Max Sauter

Ehre daaaaaaaaaaaake

amgviolin1

Thank you!

다정하게

🙏🏼

1 More Replies...

Matteo Generani

0:00 - Allegro
6:57 - Poco adagio: Cantabile
        8:09 - Var. 1
        9:16 - Var. 2
        10:26 - Var. 3
11:37 - Var. 4
13:22 - Minuetto
17:48 - Finale: Presto

Martin Riley

The second movement is one of the best examples of true music from the classical period ever written. I love the fact that it was also called ‘Austria’ for Prince Esterhàzy and later the Austrian Empire anthem under Franz I after first being the German Holy Roman Empire anthem (with the same monarch). Later being readopted by Germany in 1922. It had to be dropped by Austria in 1945 because of allied pressure. When listening to this you don't need words (they were changed many times) or countries, it transcends all this and makes us think about humanity. It was the last tune Haydn ever played on the piano and apparently his favourite. I’m sure it influenced his young pupil Beethoven.

Martin Riley

Elaine Blackhurst Thanks for your info. It seems it was the anthem of quite a few countries during the Austrian Empire. Still you’re right about it being written first for the Holy Roman Empire which then incorporated Austria where he was born.

Elaine Blackhurst

Martin Riley
Some muddled history in your comment.

To clarify:
Haydn had heard ‘God Save the King’ many times whilst in England between 1791 -1795; he was very moved by this first experience of a ‘national anthem’.

On his return to Austria, in short, he wrote a national song* for his own country, ‘Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser’, which was first performed in 1797.

Haydn’s Volkslied (people’s song) melody later became the German National anthem in 1922, and as is well known, remains so today; it was dropped by Austria in 1945 after some pressure from the Allies.

The melody has also been used as a hymn tune.

* I use the word ‘song’ in its correct Oxford English Dictionary meaning, not the horrible modern mutilation so widely mis-used across the world today where some think it can be used in place of the generic ‘work’ or ‘piece’, or the even more asinine usage instead of symphony, concerto, sonata, and so forth.

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