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32. Aria. Allegro
by Jan Dismas Zelenka

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Comments from YouTube:

Giandomenico Lupo

The D minor chord at 0:15 caught me off guard!

Opiter

What excellent sopranos, so clear and sweet sounding.

Tristan Perotti

I'm always a little confused by the cheery nature of Kyrie section to masses. Shouldn't it be an introspective pensive sort of work?

Ricky Amez

I got the answer from a Greek friend who is also an Othodox practicioner. Unlike the Roman rite, the Orthodox rite does not implore God's mercy for they are certain God HAS mercy because he is lovely and benignant. So, the accurate translation of Kyrie eleison is "The Lord has mercy" not "May the Lord have mercy". Therefore, the Kyrie eleison is, in fact, a chant of praise and joy rather than one of plea and guilt. Zelenka, but especially Mozart had the insight to compose the majority of his Kyrie eleison chants accordingly. Now, under this perspective, it all makes sense. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxcAdhRn9r0

Divergent Integral

Theologically speaking, you could interpret the imploration for God's mercy (which the Kyrie is) in several ways. Usually it is considered to be a plea uttered by fallen and sinful humanity, which would indeed lead to somber and introspective settings. But there is also a parallel tradition of the Kyrie being seen as a cheerful and ultimately optimistic submission to the deity, leading to settings of a more lively, or even tranquil character.

Stefano Paparozzi

Theoretically you're right. It seems that Kyrie is often seen as and introductory movement, so it has also a specific purpose (like the Agnus Dei is a conclusion).
I'd also consider the linguistic factor, because it's the only Greek part of the mass and the text could be perceived somehow different if a composer doesn't really think about it.

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