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I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore
Jerry Butler Lyrics


We have lyrics for 'I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore' by these artists:

Dusty Springfield In my neighborhood We don't live so good The rooms are small…
Melissa Manchester In my neighbourhood We don't live so good The rooms are sm…
P. J Proby In my neighborhood where folks don't live so good now. The…
Scott Walker In my neighbourhood, where folks don't live so good now The…
Shelby Lynne In my neighborhood We don't live so good The rooms are small…
The Walker Brothers In my neighbourhood, where folks don't live so good now The…
Walker Brothers In my neighbourhood, where folks don't live so good now The…

We have lyrics for these tracks by Jerry Butler:

A Brand New Me This is my same old coat These are my same old…
Ain Ohhh I thank God for you (I thank God, I thank God) You…
Ain't Understanding Mellow Ohhh I thank God for you (I thank God, I thank God) You…
Ain't Understanding Mellow (feat. Brenda Lee Eager) JERRY'S PART Ohhhhhhhhhhh I thank God for you (I thank God,…
Alfie What's it all about, Alfie? Is it just for the moment…
Are You Happy You're a very pretty girl And all that's good A lot of…
Aware of Love I'm aware of love At last, I'm aware of love' I asked…
Brand New Me This is my same old coat These are my same old…
Can She looks in the mirror and stares at the wrinkles That…
Close To You Why do birds suddenly appear? Every time you are near Just l…
Don Don't let love hang you up Don't let it make you…
Find Another Girl Find yourself another girl who will love you true true…
For You Precious Love Your precious love means more to me Than any love could…
Giving Up On Love (Giving up, giving up) (Giving up, giving up) This is no…
Good Times Got no job and my pockets They don't jingle But as long…
He Don't Love You Don't let love hang you up Don't let it make you…
He Will Break Your Heart He don't love you like I love you If he did,…
Hey Oh Western Union man Send a telegram to my baby Send…
Hey Western Union Man Oh, western union man send a telegram to my baby Send…
Hey, Western Union Man HEY, WESTERN UNION MAN Jerry Butler Oh western union man Se…
How Did We Lose It Baby We had a love that was our pride And inspiration to…
I Oh I'll never let you under my skin Baby, I just…
I Can't Stand It I can't stand the pain of love When you get all…
I Come To You I dig you, baby, I dig you, yes, I do I…
I Could Write A Book A-B-C-D-E-G I never learned to spell At least not well. …
I Dig You Baby I dig you, baby, I dig you, yes, I do I…
I Don't Want to Hear Anymore In my neighborhood Where folks don't live so good now The ro…
I Only Have Eyes For You My love must be a kind of blind love I can't…
I Stand Accused I stand accused of loving you too much I hope, I…
I'm a Telling You I'm a-telling you, Oh I'm a-telling you I'm a-telling you, O…
I'm Telling You I'm a telling you I'm a telling you I'm a telling you I'm…
I'm the One That Loves You I'm the one who loves you I'm the one who loves…
I've Been Loving You Too Long I've been loving you too long to stop now You were…
I've Been Trying I've been tryin' Lord knows that I've been tryin' To under…
If It's Real What I Feel Featuring Brenda Lee Eager Gotta let you know just how I…
It's All Right Say it's all right, it's all right Say it's all right,…
It's Too Late Soon it's never more When you've got to pay for Promises, …
I’m A Telling You I'm a-telling you, Oh I'm a-telling you I'm a-telling you, …
Just Because I Really Love You Just because I really love you Just because I really love…
Let It Be Me I bless the day I found you I want to stay…
Lost I was a sad and lonely girl All alone in this…
Make It Easy on Yourself 'Cause breaking up is so Very hard to do If you really…
Moody Woman Oh, I love you when you hug and kiss me I…
Moon River Moon river, wider than a mile I'm crossing you in…
Mr. Dream Merchant Hey, Mr. Dream Merchant Everything depends on you Oh, he…
Need to Belong Wo oh oh oh (need to belong) yeah, (to someone) M…
Need To Belong To Somebody Wo oh oh oh (need to belong) yeah, (to someone) Mm…
Never Give You Up Never gonna give you up No matter how you treat me Never…
No Money Down No Money Down With no money down... Pay later not now... W…
One Night Affair Oh I'll never let you under my skin Baby, I just…
Only The Strong Survive I remember, my first love affair Somehow or another the whol…
September Song Oh, it's a long, long while from May to December But…
The Way You Do The Things You Do You got a smile so bright You know you could have…
Walk Easy My Son When I was a very small boy (Just a small boy) Looked…
Western Union Man Oh Western Union man Send a telegram to my baby Send…
what ever you want Whatever you want I want for you Whatever you need I need fo…
What's The Use Of Breaking Up What's the use in breakin' up When you just turn…
Whatever You Want Whatever you want I want for you Whatever you need I need fo…
Where Are You Going Where are you going Tell me what you want to be You're…
You And Me You must believe me No matter what the people might say You…
You Can Fly Here you are again Tellin' me you're sorry, baby Tellin' me …
You Can Run (But You Cant Hide Sit down awhile My mother said one day And this is what…
You Can Run but You Can't Hide Sit down awhile My mother said one day And this is what…

The lyrics can frequently be found in the comments below, by filtering for lyric videos or browsing the comments in the different videos below.
Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Michael Garin

From the Financial Times:
There aren’t many pop songs about badly constructed buildings. Among the rare examples, even fewer can be said to shed light on the tides of 20th-century history — from America’s great northward migration to the 1960s British invasion; from the birth of soul music to British light entertainment. “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” might be the only one.

In 1964 a talented teen with a $100-a-month songwriting gig produced a lyric about an oddly adult mini-melodrama. Randy Newman’s “I Don’t Want to Hear Anymore” (the title acquired an “it” a few years later) is both sparse and cinematic. Scene: “My neighbourhood [where] folks don’t live so good.” Plot: flimsy walls mean the singer can’t escape hearing “the neighbours talking about you and me”. Pitifully, as they broadcast his faithless partner’s every scandalous move, he blames the walls: “They’re much too thin.”

How does a middle-class boy from a family of Hollywood soundtrack composers capture life in a low-rent tenement? “What interests me,” Newman told Rolling Stone in 1983, “is character study. Fiction . . . it’s what I do best.”

Meanwhile singer Jerry Butler was looking for his next hit. At 24, he had already launched The Impressions with Curtis Mayfield and recorded one of the first Chicago soul records. His solo sales had helped make Vee-Jay — a Chicago precursor to Motown — one of America’s biggest black-owned (and rare female-owned) music companies. Vee-Jay’s A&R man “freaked out” over Newman’s demo, Butler wrote in his autobiography.

“Was it black?” wrote Butler. “Was it white? It could have been anybody’s song.” But his elegant, unvarnished baritone calls to mind the Chicago gospel choir in which he and Mayfield sang as boys. It also calls to mind the millions of African-Americans who, like the Butlers, fled the brutal racism of the South in the great migration. They created cultures and built businesses, like Motown and Vee-Jay, that would shape the 20th century.

And that “neighbourhood where folks don’t live so good” evokes conditions the travellers found in northern cities. Many, including the Butlers, ended up in housing projects that entrenched urban discrimination.

For LA’s Walker Brothers, over in London while British acts invaded the US charts, covering Butler’s back catalogue had already proved fruitful — a familiar story in the segregated 1960s music business. Their 1965 version of “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” smoothes over the grit with sweet strings and Scott Walker’s swooping vocals. Walker adds a telling ad lib: “These walls round me are so thin — sometimes I think they’re moving in.” The lines foreshadow his retreat from the fear and frustration of life as an avant-garde composer trapped in the body of a teen idol.

Four years later Dusty Springfield turned to the luminaries of Atlantic Records to escape a commercial lull. She later called “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” “my favourite song” on the resulting Dusty in Memphis LP. Butler’s spare soul ballad was now an extravagantly orchestrated torch song. The Sweet Inspirations, borrowed from

Aretha Franklin, supplied exquisite backing vocals. Springfield’s vocals sound almost weary. Like Walker, she puts her passion into the ad lib: “I just can’t stand to hear it any more.” Perhaps, once again, this study in unwelcome scrutiny resonates. At a time when being outed as gay could end a career, she was repeatedly quizzed about her relationships with women. There are other wonderful versions: a spirited 1965 jazz instrumental by Chicago’s Three Souls; a swinging 1969 soul cover by Chicago jazz singer Lorez Alexandria. The same year, Patrick Samson released “I Muri Parlano Di Noi” (“These walls are talking about us”), one of the Beirut-born singer’s many Italian reinterpretations of English-language pop hits.

But it is Springfield’s recording that completes the work’s great musical migration — taking it back to the Southern roots of the black music she and its New Orleans-raised writer both revered, and to those of its first and most affecting singer.



All comments from YouTube:

Mary Denise

I had never heard this man till last week now I am hooked on his lovely voice  he has a mighty fine voice...The best music comes from USA,..

george george

A true soulful, beautiful baritone voice.

Mark Bruggeman

he has the best voice of all time. Along with David Ruffin

Mary Denise

I have just ordered one of his cds from amazon uk  as I really enjoyed listening to his songs ..David Ruffin Cd are very expensive at Amazon UK  I just hope mine stay in good condition and I don't need to replace them.

gaynormartin

Jerry Butler records  Command very high prices in the Uk... Originals of,  For your precious love,sell for as much as 2300 dollars.  The Impressions are also in demand , and very expensive also.

anniling

brings back such beautiful memories, thank you

richard shepherd

freshman 1966 at southern university baton rouge RIP jerry/curtis

hookalakah

Before the general public knew his name, Randy Newman wrote a lot of songs. If this isn't the best, it's got to be one of the best of his early efforts.

Michael Garin

From the Financial Times:
There aren’t many pop songs about badly constructed buildings. Among the rare examples, even fewer can be said to shed light on the tides of 20th-century history — from America’s great northward migration to the 1960s British invasion; from the birth of soul music to British light entertainment. “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” might be the only one.

In 1964 a talented teen with a $100-a-month songwriting gig produced a lyric about an oddly adult mini-melodrama. Randy Newman’s “I Don’t Want to Hear Anymore” (the title acquired an “it” a few years later) is both sparse and cinematic. Scene: “My neighbourhood [where] folks don’t live so good.” Plot: flimsy walls mean the singer can’t escape hearing “the neighbours talking about you and me”. Pitifully, as they broadcast his faithless partner’s every scandalous move, he blames the walls: “They’re much too thin.”

How does a middle-class boy from a family of Hollywood soundtrack composers capture life in a low-rent tenement? “What interests me,” Newman told Rolling Stone in 1983, “is character study. Fiction . . . it’s what I do best.”

Meanwhile singer Jerry Butler was looking for his next hit. At 24, he had already launched The Impressions with Curtis Mayfield and recorded one of the first Chicago soul records. His solo sales had helped make Vee-Jay — a Chicago precursor to Motown — one of America’s biggest black-owned (and rare female-owned) music companies. Vee-Jay’s A&R man “freaked out” over Newman’s demo, Butler wrote in his autobiography.

“Was it black?” wrote Butler. “Was it white? It could have been anybody’s song.” But his elegant, unvarnished baritone calls to mind the Chicago gospel choir in which he and Mayfield sang as boys. It also calls to mind the millions of African-Americans who, like the Butlers, fled the brutal racism of the South in the great migration. They created cultures and built businesses, like Motown and Vee-Jay, that would shape the 20th century.

And that “neighbourhood where folks don’t live so good” evokes conditions the travellers found in northern cities. Many, including the Butlers, ended up in housing projects that entrenched urban discrimination.

For LA’s Walker Brothers, over in London while British acts invaded the US charts, covering Butler’s back catalogue had already proved fruitful — a familiar story in the segregated 1960s music business. Their 1965 version of “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” smoothes over the grit with sweet strings and Scott Walker’s swooping vocals. Walker adds a telling ad lib: “These walls round me are so thin — sometimes I think they’re moving in.” The lines foreshadow his retreat from the fear and frustration of life as an avant-garde composer trapped in the body of a teen idol.

Four years later Dusty Springfield turned to the luminaries of Atlantic Records to escape a commercial lull. She later called “I Don’t Want to Hear it Anymore” “my favourite song” on the resulting Dusty in Memphis LP. Butler’s spare soul ballad was now an extravagantly orchestrated torch song. The Sweet Inspirations, borrowed from

Aretha Franklin, supplied exquisite backing vocals. Springfield’s vocals sound almost weary. Like Walker, she puts her passion into the ad lib: “I just can’t stand to hear it any more.” Perhaps, once again, this study in unwelcome scrutiny resonates. At a time when being outed as gay could end a career, she was repeatedly quizzed about her relationships with women. There are other wonderful versions: a spirited 1965 jazz instrumental by Chicago’s Three Souls; a swinging 1969 soul cover by Chicago jazz singer Lorez Alexandria. The same year, Patrick Samson released “I Muri Parlano Di Noi” (“These walls are talking about us”), one of the Beirut-born singer’s many Italian reinterpretations of English-language pop hits.

But it is Springfield’s recording that completes the work’s great musical migration — taking it back to the Southern roots of the black music she and its New Orleans-raised writer both revered, and to those of its first and most affecting singer.

Complete Charleston

"The Wonders" brought me here (from the Billboard Charts in "That Thing You Do" movie)

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