Blame It on the Stones
Kris Kristofferson Lyrics


Mister Marvin middle class is really in a stew
Wondering' what the younger generation's coming to
And the taste of his martini doesn't please his bitter tongue
Blame it on the rolling stones.

Blame it on the stones; blame it on the stones
You'll feel so much better, knowing you don't stand alone
Join the accusation; save the bleeding nation
Get it off your shoulders; blame it on the stones
Mother tells the ladies at the bridge club every day
Of the rising price of tranquilizers she must pay
And she wonders why the children never seem to stay at home
Blame it on the rolling stones.

Blame it on the stones; blame it on the stones
You'll feel so much better, knowing you don't stand alone
Join the accusation; save the bleeding nation
Get it off your shoulders; blame it on the stones

Father's at the office, nightly working all the time
Trying to make the secretary change her little mind
And it bothers him to read about so many broken homes
Blame it on those rolling stones.

Blame it on the stones; blame it on the stones
You'll feel so much better knowing you don't stand alone
Join the accusation; same the bleeding nation
Get it off your shoulders; blame it on the stones

Blame it on the stones, blame it on the stones.

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Written by: JOHN W. WILKIN, KRISTOFFER KRISTOFFERSON

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Pedro Álvarez

"Blame It on the Stones" (Kristofferson, John Wilkin) – 2:46
First song
first side
first album
by
Kris Kristofferson.
Kristofferson.- the first album by Kris Kristofferson, released in 1970 on Monument Records.
"Kristofferson". the first album by Kris Kristofferson was re-released under the title
-"Me and Bobby McGee" in 1971.



All comments from YouTube:

But Not Today

Added to the back of the CD I just purchased: "In the ongoing narrative of American music, Kris Kristofferson's story is a most remarkable chapter. After all, how many Rhodes scholars, turned Army captains, turned recording studio janitors, became first rate, highly successful, Nashville singer, songwriters, and major Hollywood stars? All of the above, and much, much more happened to kristofferson, and his songs, especially the batch that appeared on this, his 1970 debut album, we're crucial in defining the new, "outlaw country" style. His best work evinced a plainspoken eloquence, extraordinary even in an idiom famous for it. After being championed by Johnny Cash, another American original of flinty integrity, he was on his way, via slices of life like, Me and Bobby McGee, Help Me Make it Through the Night, For the Good Times and Sunday Morning Coming Down. All depicted people at some way at the ends of their ropes, and each topped the pop or country charts when covered by such notables as, Janis Joplin and Johnny Cash. but no one interprets Kristofferson like Kristofferson, and while the Kraggy, smoky voice on this newly expanded set may not be golden, it repeatedly strikes pure, storytelling gold."

whitetroutchannel

my old boy used to have this goin full pelt on vinyl when i was wee fuckin class

Whiskeyme Broham

50 years ago today, played at "Isle of Wright Peace & Love Festival"
✌ Thank you for the Trip Down Loss of Memory Lane. 🕰
Viewer 47,466 August 26,2020 çÔ¿Ôp

Jeff Miletich

Senior year in high school (71-72) I had print shop. I printed up a bunch of note pads with "Blame It On The Stones " at the top. My mother really liked them.

oughts sought

still remember the rush it was to hear this opening song to this album when I was a teenager & got my copy home, bought 'cuz I'd heard "Sunday Morning Coming Down" on a country station on my dad's car radio. JohnnyCash's liner notes on the album clinched the purchase at the store.
this song is so on target & the musical delivery is ragingly moreso ... the best echo I know to Blonde On Blonde's "Rainy Day Women #12 & #35" singing 'EVERYBODY MUST GET STONED" with its partying churchless revival band glee holler ... and a great reply to the noise made against that song in the press. This song replied to A LOT of various atmospheric media slanders pointed at wild-haired youth ... and music was the only media in which we'd hear these (at first rare, then popular) replies to the usual stereotyping media rot. This song was one of a dozen goose bump classics that stood up loud & clear as replies.

hammer44head

Actually this song was a response to all the criticsm the Stones were getting about Altamont and its supposed end to the dreamy sixties.In reality most older people had no idea who the Stones were.They all blamed the Beatles with their long hair on the collapse of American youth.At least my Granpa did.:)

ZoneFighter1

I think "The Law Is For The Protection Of The People" is even better.

pat anderson

OMG it has been such a long time since I heard this album...thank you!

Pedro Álvarez

"Blame It on the Stones" (Kristofferson, John Wilkin) – 2:46
First song
first side
first album
by
Kris Kristofferson.
Kristofferson.- the first album by Kris Kristofferson, released in 1970 on Monument Records.
"Kristofferson". the first album by Kris Kristofferson was re-released under the title
-"Me and Bobby McGee" in 1971.

kath nh

Why did I wake up singing this song this morning? I haven't heard it in years! I conned my husband to take me to the Boston Symphony Hall years ago to see Kristofferson in 1972.. He wasn't crazy about him but he agreed. What he enjoyed was the fact that when Kris came out on stage, he apparently had had to sign a waiver saying he wouldn't use any profanity while on stage. It was a great show, musically, and funnier because Kris had so much fun throwing around different words in place of any expletives or profanity. He'd use crazy words in place of the usual four-letter work that starts with and F or even a D, because they told that was no appropriate either. Then he started using these words that were four syllables long that most of us had never heard, but because he's so highly educated, I'm sure they were real words. He had us all laughing so much, in between songs, that even my husband, who didn't think he could sing, said it was a good show! The guy had everything; a Rhodes Scholar; incredibly handsome, a beautiful deep voice. He could write any kind of music and he obviously, he had a great wit! I enjoyed him and that concert very much!

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