The Fight Song
Marilyn Manson Lyrics


Jump to: Overall Meaning ↴  Line by Line Meaning ↴

Nothing suffocates you more than
The passing of everyday human events
And isolation is the oxygen mask
You make your children breathe in to survive

But I'm not a slave
To a god that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave
To a world that doesn't give a shit

And when we were good
You just closed your eyes
So when we are bad
We'll scar your minds

Fight, fight, fight, fight
Fight, fight, fight, fight

You'll never grow up to be a big rockstar
Celebrated victim of your fame
Just cut our wrists like cheap coupons
And say that death was on sale today

And when we were good
You just closed your eyes
So when we are bad
We'll scar your minds

But I'm not a slave
To a god that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave
To a world that doesn't give a shit

The death of one is a tragedy
The death of one is a tragedy
The death of one is a tragedy
The death of millions is just a statistic

But I'm not a slave
To a god that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave
To a world that doesn't give a shit
But I'm not a slave
To a god that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave
To a world that doesn't give a shit





Fight, fight, fight, fight
Fight, fight, fight, fight

Overall Meaning

The Fight Song by Marilyn Manson is an anthem for those who feel suffocated and isolated by everyday human events. The lyrics describe how isolation can be like an oxygen mask that people use to survive, even though it can be suffocating. Manson then declares that he is not a slave to a god that doesn't exist or to a world that doesn't care, and encourages others to fight against their oppressors. The song uses the recurring refrain "Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight!" to drive home the message of resistance.


The lyrics also touch on the idea of celebrity culture and the way society consumes and disposes of its celebrities. Manson states that young people who dream of being rock stars will eventually be cut down by the same society that once celebrated them. The line "they'll just cut our wrists like cheap coupons and say that death was on sale today" is a haunting commentary on the way society treats its famous and the disposable nature of fame.


In addition to these themes, Manson also makes a bold statement about the value of human life. He declares that one death is a tragedy, but the death of millions is just a statistic. This line is a powerful reminder of the way that human suffering can be ignored or dismissed by those in power.


Line by Line Meaning

Nothing suffocates you more than The passing of everyday human events
The mundane daily happenings can stifle and choke you.


Isolation is the oxygen mask you make Your children breath into survive
You impose a life of seclusion on your kids to protect them from the cruelty of the world.


But I'm not a slave to a god That doesn't exist
I refuse to bow down to a non-existent deity.


And I'm not a slave to a world That doesn't give a shit
I refuse to submit to a world that is apathetic towards me.


And when we were good You just closed your eyes So when we are bad We'll scar your minds
You ignore us when we're happy, so when we're not, we'll inflict emotional distress on you.


Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight!
A call to arms; to stand up and fight.


You'll never grow up to be a big-rock-star Celebrated-victim-of-your-fame
You can't achieve fame while being a martyr for your cause.


They'll just cut our wrists like Cheap coupons and say that death Was on sale today
They'll take us for granted and manipulate our deaths to their benefit.


The death of one is a tragedy The death of one is a tragedy The death of one is a tragedy The death of millions is just a statistic
The value of life diminishes when numerous lives are lost; million deaths appear as mere numbers.


But I'm not a slave to a god That doesn't exist And I'm not a slave to a world That doesn't give a shit
Reiteration of the refusal to abide by the rules of an absent entity or a callous world.


Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! Fight!
Final rallying cry to stand up and fight.




Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, CONCORD MUSIC PUBLISHING LLC, Peermusic Publishing
Written by: Brian Warner, John Lowery

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

@Sara-xu6ww

These words are often attributed to the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and it was published in 1947 by the popular syndicated newspaper columnist Leonard Lyons in “The Washington Post”. What source Lyons used to obtain this quotation? Nobody knows. Perhaps future researchers will locate further relevant evidence. There are several interesting precursors that illustrate the possible evolution of this expression. Beilby Porteus? Kurt Tucholsky? Erich Maria Remarque?.................
In 1759 a classics scholar named Beilby Porteus published a prize-winning work titled “Death: A Poetical Essay”. Porteus later became a Bishop in the Church of England. The following excerpt did not contain the word “statistics”, but it did discuss tyranny and provocatively contrasted the ramifications of small and large casualty numbers. Boldface has been added to excerpts:

To sate the lust of power; more horrid still,
The foulest stain and scandal of our nature
Became its boast — One Murder made a Villain,
Millions a Hero. — Princes were privileg’d
To kill, and numbers sanctified the crime.
Ah! why will Kings forget that they are Men?

In 1916 an anarchist publication based in California called “The Blast” printed a story that contrasted the feelings engendered by the personalized death of one individual versus the depersonalized death of many: 4

There is double the pathos for us in the death of one little New York waif from hunger than there is in a million deaths from famine in China. It is not that distance glosses over the terrible picture of the Chinese horror, or that a feeling of national kinship with the waif impresses us the more sincerely with his plight. It is merely that the mind is unable to grasp a suffering in the gross. Suffering is so intimately personal a thing that it must be explained through the personal equation, if at all

In 1925 a journalist and satirist named Kurt Tucholsky wrote a piece in a German newspaper that included a statement that was similar to the quotation (...)

At which a diplomat from French Ministry of Foreign Affairs replies: “The war? I can’t find it too terrible! The death of one man: that is a catastrophe. One hundred thousand deaths: that is a statistic!”

In 1932 “The Christian Science Monitor” printed an article describing a meeting that included George Bernard Shaw, Lady Astor, and Stalin. The article did not contain a statement matching the quotation, but it did contain a thematically related comment attributed to Stalin that portrayed him as a callous autocrat indifferent to death although the reporter expressed uncertainty about the veracity of the tale:

Although the interview which the Shaw-Astor party had with Stalin was theoretically secret, the story is told in Moscow that hardly had his guests been shown into the room when Lady Astor exuberantly opened the conversation with this remark: “Mr. Stalin, how long are you going to continue killing people?”

The Soviet Dictator quietly answered: “As long as it is necessary.”

Whether or not this story is true, it is illustrative of the Communist conception of government.

In 1939 a newspaper in Wisconsin reprinted a short item that contrasted the divergent responses evoked by the varying number of causalities caused by an individual:

If you shoot one person you are a murderer. If you kill a couple persons you are a gangster. If you are a crazy statesman and send millions to their deaths you are a hero. — Watertown Daily Times.

As noted previously in this article, in January 1947 the saying was attributed to Stalin in a syndicated column by Leonard Lyons:

Stalin interrupted him to say: “If only one man dies of hunger, that is a tragedy. If millions die, that’s only statistics.”

Also in 1947 Charlie Chaplin played the role of Henri Verdoux in the movie “Monsieur Verdoux”. A line from the script written and spoken by Chaplin echoed the words Beilby Porteus:

That’s the history of many a big business. Wars, conflict, it’s all business. One murder makes a villain, millions a hero. Numbers sanctify my good fellow.

In October 1948 “The Atlantic” monthly magazine published an instance, but the words were not attributed to Stalin; instead, the speaker was characterized only as a “Frenchman”. The quotation appeared in a book review column called “The Atlantic Bookshelf” which was written by Charles J. Rolo. This attribution may have been an echo of Tucholsky’s French diplomat:

Scourges as immense as fascism and war present the novelist with a knotty problem of ways and means. A Frenchman has aptly remarked that “a single man killed is a misfortune, a million is a statistic.” How to encompass the emotional reality of that aggregate of horrors which so easily becomes “a statistic” or a remote abstraction — “war dead,” “purge,” “pogrom”?

In 1956 the German novel “Der Schwarze Obelisk” by the prominent author Erich Maria Remarque was released. In 1957 it was translated into English and published as “The Black Obelisk”. Remarque included an instance without attribution:

It’s strange, I think, all of us have seen so many dead in the war and we know that over two million of us fell uselessly—why, then, are we so excited about a single man, when we have practically forgotten the two million already? But probably the reason is that one dead man is death—and two million are only a statistic.

In 1958 “The New York Times” published a book review that presented the saying with an ascription to Stalin:

“A single death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic.” Stalin’s epigram is admirably illustrated by Ernst Schnabel’s pointilliste portrait of Anne Frank during the few months she lived after the last entry in her diary, Aug. 1, 1944.

In conclusion, the saying was attributed to Joseph Stalin by 1947, but the evidentiary support for the linkage was not clear . Columnist Lyons stated that the words were spoken during a meeting “of the highest ranking Commissars”. Perhaps a statement was made by a witness, but no one has located such a document until the present time. The satirist Kurt Tucholsky placed a similar remark into the mouth of a French diplomat in a piece that was available in German by 1925.



@aaronthatweirdkidwithlongh2490

But yet nicki manaj who objectifies herself and most other women can say what she wants

How biased can censorship be

Let an artist express hinself and if you dont want your little kids to be "ridiculed" then dont let them out into the world because the more you hide the world from them and try make them perfect the more theyll rebel and refuse to conform

Am I right ???

So go ahead all you parents who want perfect kids

Keep pressuring them to be fucking perfect but you cant make someone something.



@henriqueramos3197

"The Fight Song"

[Verse 1]
Nothing suffocates you more than
The passing of everyday human events
And isolation is the oxygen mask
You make your children breathe in to survive

[Chorus]
But I'm not a slave
To a God that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave to a world
That doesn't give a shit
And when we were good
You just closed your eyes
So when we are bad
We'll scar your minds

[Post-Chorus]
Fight, fight, fight, fight
Fight, fight, fight, fight

[Verse 2]
You'll never grow up to be a big rock star
Celebrated victim of your fame
They'll just cut our wrists like cheap coupons
And say that death was on sale today

[Chorus]
And when we were good
You just closed your eyes
So when we are bad
We'll scar your minds
But I'm not a slave
To a God that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave to a world
That doesn't give a shit

[Bridge]
The death of one is a tragedy
The death of one is a tragedy
The death of one is a tragedy
The death of millions' just a statistic

[Chorus]
But I'm not a slave
To a God that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave to a world
That doesn't give a shit
But I'm not a slave
To a God that doesn't exist
And I'm not a slave to a world
That doesn't give a shit

[Post-Chorus]
Fight, fight, fight, fight
Fight, fight, fight, fight

Produced by Marilyn Manson & Dave Sardy
Written by Marilyn Manson & John 5
Album "Holy Wood (In The Shadow Of The Valley Of Death" (2000)



All comments from YouTube:

@SeigneurSidious

What's the point of censoring a song of Marylin Manson ? Making it children friendly ?

@tigress5212

hahaha! yeah... wouldn't want the word "sh&%" spoiling this otherwise-family-friendly, wholesome video ;)

@elideroo3208

Indeed, Manson's goal is to criticize America and human in general so the censorship is really stupid

@kiba3x

Ridiculous.

@simplicitylost

SeigneurSidious Originally, videos were only broadcast on TV where they were auto censored. Many artists during this era released the videos pre-censored. This was before YouTube. If it were rereleased now, it would probably be uncensored. I believe his newer videos are not censored.

@PrincessDesert

Hum...do you watch TV or? lmaof everything is censored lolol imagine if a show aired around 7 PM and the protagonist screamed "COOOOCKSUCKAAAA !!!" so loud, America would be in shock that night while eating chips on their couch .

167 More Replies...

@wadstermind4913

"I'M NOT A SLAVE TO A WORLD THAT DOESN'T GIVE A SHIT!!" I feel the same.

@jazzie634

If there is a god (and if there is, it's probably not one of these bullshit gods us humans made up) then Marilyn Manson is a gift straight from it.

@wadstermind4913

lol

@madelinecorpus2482

from the SATAN....? what?

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