Nature's Way
Spirit Lyrics


It's nature's way of telling you something's wrong
It's nature's way of telling you in a song

It's nature's way of receiving you
It's nature's way of retrieving you
It's nature's way of telling you
Something's wrong

It's nature's way of telling you, soon we'll freeze
It's nature's way of telling you, dying trees

It's nature's way of receiving you
It's nature's way of retrieving you
It's nature's way of telling you
Something's wrong
It's nature's way, it's nature's way
It's nature's way, it's nature's way

It's nature's way of telling you
It's nature's way of telling you
Something's wrong
It's nature's way of telling you
It's nature's way of telling you
In a song, oh-h

It's nature's way of receiving you
It's nature's way
It's nature's way of retrieving you
It's nature's way
It's nature's way of telling you
Something's wrong, something's wrong, something's wrong

Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, Universal Music Publishing Group
Written by: RANDY CALIFORNIA

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Denny Smith

@PinkSteel Those are very apt nutshell definitions, Pink Steel! I'm glad you challenged my cavalier thoughts. Rap definitely has more substance, and has always has demonstrated immense potential, often immense power, and like in every genre, several artists produce songs of absolute art. I think I was initially thrown off by some misogynistic and homophobic lyrics, but I know those do not represent all artists. I recognize those levels of skill and power, now riding the waves of global culture, world music and fusion, and having a rich, progressive effect on the future of music.
I don't care too much positively or negatively about different genres, per se--jazz, soul, gospel, R&B, Rock 'n Roll, C&W, reggae, ska, disco, doo-wop, girl-groups, etc can all be incredible, or sometimes not so much. I have been fortunate enough over the years to hear Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, Dionne Warwick, Bette Midler, Laura Nyro and Patti La Belle in person. All incredible performers.
I studied music theory in college, which is wonderful but gifts a curse--critical listening. If it's not Brahms, it's just another banal effort to be Brahms! It begins innocently, with Pythagorean geometry, then inches through Gregorian chant, dissects counterpoint for three years nonstop and only gives aces to hyper-articulate, sloppily dressed precisionists who sacrificed a scholarship in non-Euclidean geometry and a polyamorous marriage proposal from Brangelina to pursue the viola life chair in the Webern Quartet of Moldova. It often ends not with an Oscar for Best Song, but an 18-year-fundraising commitment to the Wittgenstein Toastmasters Society of New Bratislava, Wisconsin.
I'm being goofy but really I skipped all the career seriousness because I'd rather obsess on Laura Nyro, Nina Simone, Stravinsky and Ravel. Or retro ballroom, like waltz and mazurkas, and reborn Big-Band glory, which as you know enjoys a cult devotion in Europe. A link for your edification awaits below. Latin songbirds from the 30s and 40s are intoxicating, as are all the Afro-Latin rhythms of the samba, rumba, bossa nova . . .
I admit there are sounds I just despise, no matter how hard I try to "get" them. They boil down to soft-pop, grit-rock, shock-zonk and fascist Maga, starting with that grossly comforting "Christian television" sound, riding the same broken elevator with "heavy metal," (any other kind?) electro-pop (ouch) and house sounds (not tonight, please?), of which all four are actually clever names for noise.
I hate sounding like a geezer on bad drugs, but those four monsters of the studio session seem dispossessed of harmony as it evolved on Earth, trade in negative counterpoint and promote a devotion to the gods of violence. In other words, in my ears, those are anti-melody, pro-decibel projects against the Western thingy called lyric poetry, originating with the Greeks, or music with words, high-mark: Hollywood, or narrative song with a a sequential story arc, a lot more hummable than broken knees in Tin Pan Alley. Funny enough, Bob Dylan just won a Nobel for music that shared a stage with bands that sound like "Jesus & Them Damn Devils." If I had to review the miscarriages I call "Electronic," "Metallic," "Christian" and "House," I'd say they are, respectively: 1) a relentless, radioactive, high-wire telegram to ice-out everyone Putin hates, 2) laconic, white lugs in a deafening, abrasive biker-bar below GOP HQ, 3) crank-all-the-way-to-the-right & soak-your-poor, victimized, mega-church pastor in a no-guilt, all-victim, opiated hot-tub, (the hyphens seem to help their reading comprehension) and 4) amplification of grit as jackhammered in-between the rough-textured enamel of chipped teeth without anesthesia until the mouth resembles an old, crusty chalkboard bleeding from a safe distance.
I want to add that the big mega-churches do not represent many good Christian people, people who actually live like Jesus. They are utterly different than the hypocrites who preach hate. Same, I'm sure, with electronica, heavy metal and house DJs--there are probably folks who would dazzle me with their faves.
Meanwhile, I finish my review while quietly sipping a chilled goblet of Vouvrey by the ivy-strewn grave of Franz Schubert, listening to vintage Sam Cooke. A stream gurgles nearby, and from the mistier distance rolls in the deep, masculine euphony of a lithely muscled young man whose baritone command of Mendelssohn brings songbirds to a pause, and earns a cocked ear from a chestnut stag standing calm and broad-chested in his territorial wood, while an auburn-furred fox points, enraptured, in the song's direction, just like the nearby quail, beaver, pheasant and woodchuck . . . they drink the nectar of nature, served cantabile by a wandering, hopefully single, Caruso Cole of Caribou Woods . . . !

Here's that link. A fantastic, old swing song done fresh, in Polish! -- Love the rhythm of that generation. And these kids are gooood!

https://youtu.be/PjdXJaONGCY



All comments from YouTube:

judasplow25

When the harmonizing kicks in it's so sad and beautiful it makes you feel like crying. This song is a masterpiece!

LARRY YATSKO

This song really grows on you. It just sounds so natural.

Denny Smith

Agree. Kills me every time.

Rene Brown

I actually do ..lol

AbortRetry Fail?

If there were ever an appropriate time to blast this tune from every air wave on the planet, it's now.

Denny Smith

@PinkSteel I also find myself listening to the old stuff that still satisfies, still just makes me happy. But I went to your channel and found I very much like the music you posted there. I hadn't heard it before and really liked it!
Thanks, Pink Steel.

Denny Smith

@PinkSteel Those are very apt nutshell definitions, Pink Steel! I'm glad you challenged my cavalier thoughts. Rap definitely has more substance, and has always has demonstrated immense potential, often immense power, and like in every genre, several artists produce songs of absolute art. I think I was initially thrown off by some misogynistic and homophobic lyrics, but I know those do not represent all artists. I recognize those levels of skill and power, now riding the waves of global culture, world music and fusion, and having a rich, progressive effect on the future of music.
I don't care too much positively or negatively about different genres, per se--jazz, soul, gospel, R&B, Rock 'n Roll, C&W, reggae, ska, disco, doo-wop, girl-groups, etc can all be incredible, or sometimes not so much. I have been fortunate enough over the years to hear Benny Goodman, Ella Fitzgerald, Dionne Warwick, Bette Midler, Laura Nyro and Patti La Belle in person. All incredible performers.
I studied music theory in college, which is wonderful but gifts a curse--critical listening. If it's not Brahms, it's just another banal effort to be Brahms! It begins innocently, with Pythagorean geometry, then inches through Gregorian chant, dissects counterpoint for three years nonstop and only gives aces to hyper-articulate, sloppily dressed precisionists who sacrificed a scholarship in non-Euclidean geometry and a polyamorous marriage proposal from Brangelina to pursue the viola life chair in the Webern Quartet of Moldova. It often ends not with an Oscar for Best Song, but an 18-year-fundraising commitment to the Wittgenstein Toastmasters Society of New Bratislava, Wisconsin.
I'm being goofy but really I skipped all the career seriousness because I'd rather obsess on Laura Nyro, Nina Simone, Stravinsky and Ravel. Or retro ballroom, like waltz and mazurkas, and reborn Big-Band glory, which as you know enjoys a cult devotion in Europe. A link for your edification awaits below. Latin songbirds from the 30s and 40s are intoxicating, as are all the Afro-Latin rhythms of the samba, rumba, bossa nova . . .
I admit there are sounds I just despise, no matter how hard I try to "get" them. They boil down to soft-pop, grit-rock, shock-zonk and fascist Maga, starting with that grossly comforting "Christian television" sound, riding the same broken elevator with "heavy metal," (any other kind?) electro-pop (ouch) and house sounds (not tonight, please?), of which all four are actually clever names for noise.
I hate sounding like a geezer on bad drugs, but those four monsters of the studio session seem dispossessed of harmony as it evolved on Earth, trade in negative counterpoint and promote a devotion to the gods of violence. In other words, in my ears, those are anti-melody, pro-decibel projects against the Western thingy called lyric poetry, originating with the Greeks, or music with words, high-mark: Hollywood, or narrative song with a a sequential story arc, a lot more hummable than broken knees in Tin Pan Alley. Funny enough, Bob Dylan just won a Nobel for music that shared a stage with bands that sound like "Jesus & Them Damn Devils." If I had to review the miscarriages I call "Electronic," "Metallic," "Christian" and "House," I'd say they are, respectively: 1) a relentless, radioactive, high-wire telegram to ice-out everyone Putin hates, 2) laconic, white lugs in a deafening, abrasive biker-bar below GOP HQ, 3) crank-all-the-way-to-the-right & soak-your-poor, victimized, mega-church pastor in a no-guilt, all-victim, opiated hot-tub, (the hyphens seem to help their reading comprehension) and 4) amplification of grit as jackhammered in-between the rough-textured enamel of chipped teeth without anesthesia until the mouth resembles an old, crusty chalkboard bleeding from a safe distance.
I want to add that the big mega-churches do not represent many good Christian people, people who actually live like Jesus. They are utterly different than the hypocrites who preach hate. Same, I'm sure, with electronica, heavy metal and house DJs--there are probably folks who would dazzle me with their faves.
Meanwhile, I finish my review while quietly sipping a chilled goblet of Vouvrey by the ivy-strewn grave of Franz Schubert, listening to vintage Sam Cooke. A stream gurgles nearby, and from the mistier distance rolls in the deep, masculine euphony of a lithely muscled young man whose baritone command of Mendelssohn brings songbirds to a pause, and earns a cocked ear from a chestnut stag standing calm and broad-chested in his territorial wood, while an auburn-furred fox points, enraptured, in the song's direction, just like the nearby quail, beaver, pheasant and woodchuck . . . they drink the nectar of nature, served cantabile by a wandering, hopefully single, Caruso Cole of Caribou Woods . . . !

Here's that link. A fantastic, old swing song done fresh, in Polish! -- Love the rhythm of that generation. And these kids are gooood!

https://youtu.be/PjdXJaONGCY

PinkSteel

@Denny Smith I agree most rap, pop, and hip hop, these days have no meaning or substance. Rap definitely didn't start that way, it was about a movement. Hip hop was a feeling and euphoric state of mind. I hate what's happening to it. I like all types of music, but find myself listening to the older stuff.

Denny Smith

@Timothy Palmquist Yes! Laura Nyro, C,S & N, The Band, it was a golden age of serious rock. The dribble-drool, pop, hip-hop stuff just works my last nerve. No intelligence at all.

Denny Smith

YES

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