Little Star
The Elegants Lyrics


Oh Denise, shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you

Denise, Denise, oh, with your eyes so blue
Denise, Denise, I've got a crush on you
Denise, Denise, I'm so in love with you

Oh, when we walk, it seems like paradise
And when we talk, it always feels so nice
Denise, Denise, I'm so in love with you

Your my dream and I'm in heaven
Every time I look at you
When you smile it's like a dream
And I'm so lucky 'cause I found a girl like you

Oh Denise, shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you

Denise, Denise, oh won't you hold me tight
Denise, Denise, oh can we kiss goodnight
Denise, Denise, I'm so in love with you

Oh Denise, shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise shooby doo
I'm in love with you, Denise

Lyrics © Spirit Music Group
Written by: NEIL LEVENSON

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

Rick rick

@Joseph F Danza He was a great man. You're talking about payola which they all did. It was part of the business. Dick Clark charmed his way out of it. This is from Google:

was an American disc jockey.[1] He became internationally known for promoting the mix of blues, country, rhythm and blues music on the radio in the United States and Europe under the name of rock and roll. His career was destroyed by the payola scandal that hit the broadcasting industry in the early 1960s.

Freed is commonly referred to as the "father of rock 'n' roll" due to his promotion of the style of music, and his introduction of the phrase "rock and roll", in reference to the musical genre, on mainstream radio in the early 1950s. He helped bridge the gap of segregation among young teenage Americans, presenting music by black artists (rather than cover versions by white artists) on his radio program, and arranging live concerts attended by racially mixed audiences.

Freed was given a weekly primetime TV series, The Big Beat, which premiered on ABC on July 12, 1957.[13] The show was scheduled for a summer run, with the understanding that if there were enough viewers, it would continue into the 1957–58 television season. Although the ratings for the show were strong, it was suddenly terminated after four weeks. During the second episode, black singer Frankie Lymon had been shown dancing with a white girl from the studio audience: the incident caused an uproar among ABC's local affiliates in the South and "would allegedly lead to the show's cancellation".[14]

During this period, Freed was seen on other popular programs of the day, including To Tell the Truth, where he is seen defending the new "rock and roll" sound to the panelists, who were all clearly more comfortable with swing music: Polly Bergen, Ralph Bellamy, and Kitty Carlisle.

Freed went on to host a local version of Big Beat over WNEW-TV in New York City until late 1959, when he was fired from the show after payola accusations against Freed surfaced.[citation needed]

In 1958, Freed faced controversy in Boston when he told the audience, "It looks like the Boston police don't want you to have a good time." As a result, Freed was arrested and charged with inciting to riot, and was fired from his job at WINS.[15]

Freed's career ended when it was shown that he had accepted payola (payments from record companies to play specific records), a practice that was highly controversial at the time. There was also a conflict of interest, that he had taken songwriting co-credits (most notably on Chuck Berry's "Maybellene"), which entitled him to receive part of a song's royalties, which he could help increase by heavily promoting the record on his own program. In another example, Harvey Fuqua of The Moonglows insisted Freed's name was not merely a credit on the song "Sincerely" and that he did actually co-write it (which would still be a conflict of interest for Freed to promote).

Freed lost his radio show on WABC, and was fired from the station altogether on November 21, 1959.[16] He also was fired from his television show (which for a time continued with a different host). In 1960, payola was made illegal. In 1962, Freed pleaded guilty to two charges of commercial bribery, for which he received a fine and a suspended sentence.

Because of the negative publicity from the payola scandal, no prestigious station would employ Freed, and he moved to the West Coast in 1960, where he worked at KDAY/1580 in Santa Monica, California. In 1962, after KDAY refused to allow him to promote "rock and roll" stage shows, Freed moved to WQAM in Miami, Florida, but that association lasted only two months. During 1964, he returned to the Los Angeles area and worked at KNOB/97.9.[18][19]

Freed died in a Palm Springs, California, hospital on January 20, 1965, from uremia and cirrhosis brought on by alcoholism, at the age of 43; he was initially interred in the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York. In March 2002, Judith Fisher Freed carried his ashes to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio.[20] On August 1, 2014, the Hall of Fame asked Alan Freed's son, Lance Freed, to remove the ashes permanently, which he did.[21][22] The Freed family later interred his ashes at Cleveland's Lake View Cemetery beneath a jukebox-shaped memorial featuring Freed's image.[23]

The 1978 motion picture American Hot Wax was inspired by Freed's contribution to the rock and roll scene. Although director Floyd Mutrux created a fictionalized account of Freed's last days in New York radio by using real-life elements outside of their actual chronology, the film does accurately convey the fond relationship between Freed, the musicians he promoted, and the audiences who listened to them.

On January 23, 1986, Freed was part of the first group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.[24] In 1988, he was also posthumously inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame.[25] On December 10, 1991, Freed was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[26] The VH1 series Behind The Music produced an episode on Freed featuring Roger Steffens. In 1998 The Official Website of Alan Freed went online with the jumpstart from Brian Levant and Michael Ochs archives as well as a home page biography written by Ben Fong-Torres. On February 26, 2002, Freed was honored at the Grammy Awards with the Trustees Award. In 2017 he was inducted into the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in Detroit, Michigan.



WM

Where are you little star?
(Where are you?)
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Twinkle twinkle little star
How I wonder where you are
Wish I may, wish I might
Make this wish come true tonight
Searched all over for a love
You're the one I'm thinkin' of
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Twinkle twinkle little star
How I wonder where you are
High above the clouds somewhere
Send me down a love to share
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoa-uh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh
Oh there you a-a-re
High ab-o-ove
Oh-oh sta-a-are
Send me a lo-o-o-o-ove
Oh there you a-a-re
Li-I-ighting you-up the sky
I need a lo-o-o-ove
Oh…



Milton Moore

It was a non-stop music-fest on a.m. radio "back in the day!" This was
and is one of the
best from that
golden era. From
a 72 year old from Dallas, Texas who
was there!😃😄😀
(What happened during this period
was harmonizing
by male quartets
was taken to a whole new level,
replacing the mundane music
produced by the
Barbershop Quartets of yesterday, thanks
to genius level
lyricists, tunesmiths, orchestrators, and
arrangers. Unfortunately, all
this was undone
and replaced by
groups who lacked singing talent so they hijacked the music industry by
featuring cacophonous arrangements played at a deafening volume
to disguise their
voices, which varied from the
mediocre to the
atrocious!



Milton Moore

Marilyn Willett:
I wrote in my comment that I am
72, if you read it.
Barbershop quartets
were featured a lot on
tv variety shows in
the 1950's when I was a lad, so one would not have to
be anywhere NEAR
95 years old to know all about them. Hopefully I can make it to 95, but only if, obviously, I were to be in good health.



Gary Hoogenboom, Sr.

Where are you little star?
(Where are you?)

Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh

Twinkle twinkle little star
How I wonder where you are
Wish I may, wish I might
Make this wish come true tonight
Searched all over for a love
You're the one I'm thinkin' of

Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh

Twinkle twinkle little star
How I wonder where you are
High above the clouds somewhere
Send me down a love to share

Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh

Whoa-uh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh

Oh there you a-a-re
High ab-o-ove
Oh-oh sta-a-ar
Send me a lo-o-o-o-ove
Oh there you a-a-re
Li-i-ighting you-up the sky
I need a lo-o-o-ove
Oh me-oh, me-oh, my-y-y-y

Twinkle twinkle little star
How I wonder where you are
Wish I may, wish I might
Make this wish come true tonight

Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh
Whoah oh, oh, oh-uh-oh
Ratta ta ta too-ooh-ooh

Oh ra, ta, ta
Ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh
There you are little star!!! (ooh)



All comments from YouTube:

Bob Kurtz

SKIP THIS the is just playing the record over one picture.

Bobbie

@wayneguy I’m in

Les Tivers

I listen, rarely watch.

Lazlo Vandor

Actually most of old videos are dubbed, so they just play the record... over a video.

Rick rick

Who even needs the song? Lol

Javier Villa

So.eazy see a photo album of your fam or ext while you listen to this beautiful song we don't need you negativity 😂😆😆

8 More Replies...

Connie Smalls

This song came out in 1958 when I was 10 years old. I remember sitting on the front porch with the family and neighborhood kids eating popsicles and enjoying this music on the radio. A sweet memory of innocent times when we didn't lock our doors. So lucky to be young in the 1950s and 60s.

Charles Lindley

So true.I've told younger people the 50's were the best time to be alive. No worries.We didn't need to lock our doors.A time before the world went crazy.

anonymous mouse

Im 22 yet I still dream of an America before the bolsheviks invaded DC. What a world you were blessed to live in, I'm pleased to say that in my family, it hasn't gone that much farther from the "norm". As I get older, and I start to see folks I grew up with conform to the modern culture, I find myself very grateful that I was given my OLDER parents.

Kockapopolis Arapopolis

I was just born March 15 1958 but I love this song❤️

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