Run Come See
The Seekers Lyrics


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It was nineteen hundred and twenty-nine (run come see)
I remember the day pretty well
Nineteen hundred and twenty-nine
Run come see Jerusalem

There was talk about a storm in the island (run come see)
My God what a beautiful morning
It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine
Run come see I remember that day very well
It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine
Run come see Jerusalem

That day they were talkin' 'bout a storm in the islands
My God what a beautiful morning
They were talkin' 'bout a storm in the islands
Run come see Jerusalem

That day there were three ships a leavin' out the harbour
The Ethel the Myrtle and the Pretoria
There were three ships a leavin' out the harbour
Run come see Jerusalem

These ships were bound for a neighbouring island
With the mothers and children on board
These ships were bound for a neighbouring island
Run come see Jerusalem

Now the Pretoria was out on the ocean
Rocking from side to side
Yes the Pretoria was out on the ocean
Run come see Jerusalem

My God when the first wave hit the Pretoria
The mothers come hauling to their children my God
When the first wave hit the Pretoria
Run come see Jerusalem

My God there were thirty-three souls on the water
Oh my God they were swimming and praying to the good Lord
There were thirty three souls on the water
Run come see Jerusalem

My God now George Brown he was the captain
He shouted come my children come pray
He said "Come now witness your judgment"
Run come see Jerusalem

It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine
Run come see I remember that day very well




It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine
Run come see Jerusalem

Overall Meaning

The Seekers's song "Run Come See" refers to a tragic event that occurred in 1929 on the island of Jamaica. The first stanza of the song sets the scene and tells us that the singer is remembering a specific day when there was talk about a storm in the island. The chorus, "run come see Jerusalem," is a call to action, perhaps a reminder to listeners to witness and learn from this historical event. The next few stanzas describe how three ships, the Ethel, the Myrtle, and the Pretoria, set sail from the harbor bound for a neighboring island with mothers and children on board.


The storm hit when the Pretoria was out on the ocean and the first wave hit the ship, causing chaos and panic among the passengers. The ship was rocking from side to side, and the mothers were desperately trying to keep their children safe. The last stanza of the song mentions George Brown, who was the captain of the ship. He called out to the passengers to come and pray, reminding them of their final judgment. The repetition of "nineteen hundred and twenty-nine" and "run come see Jerusalem" throughout the song emphasizes the historical significance of this event and perhaps encourages listeners to learn from the tragedy.


Line by Line Meaning

It was nineteen hundred and twenty-nine (run come see)
The year was 1929 and something significant was happening, calling for people to come and witness it.


I remember the day pretty well
The singer has vivid memories of the day in question.


Nineteen hundred and twenty-nine Run come see Jerusalem
The year is reiterated, and the location is revealed to be Jerusalem.


There was talk about a storm in the island (run come see)
The people were buzzing with talk of a storm approaching the island, urging others to come and see for themselves.


My God what a beautiful morning
Despite the impending storm, the morning was lovely and serene.


It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine Run come see I remember that day very well It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine Run come see Jerusalem
The year is repeated a few times, anchoring the listener in the time period and confirming the location in Jerusalem.


That day they were talkin' 'bout a storm in the islands My God what a beautiful morning They were talkin' 'bout a storm in the islands Run come see Jerusalem
The singer reiterates the talk of the storm and the beauty of the morning, giving more context to the situation and inviting others to come and see.


That day there were three ships a leavin' out the harbour The Ethel the Myrtle and the Pretoria There were three ships a leavin' out the harbour Run come see Jerusalem
Three ships were leaving the harbor that day, named Ethel, Myrtle, and Pretoria, prompting more people to come see the sight.


These ships were bound for a neighbouring island With the mothers and children on board These ships were bound for a neighbouring island Run come see Jerusalem
The ships were carrying mothers and children to a neighboring island, adding a sense of urgency and tension to the situation.


Now the Pretoria was out on the ocean Rocking from side to side Yes the Pretoria was out on the ocean Run come see Jerusalem
The Pretoria ship was out on the ocean, affected by the storm and struggling to maintain stability, further emphasizing the danger of the situation.


My God when the first wave hit the Pretoria The mothers come hauling to their children my God When the first wave hit the Pretoria Run come see Jerusalem
The first wave hit the Pretoria, causing panic amongst the mothers who frantically tried to protect their children, heightening the tension and danger of the situation.


My God there were thirty-three souls on the water Oh my God they were swimming and praying to the good Lord There were thirty three souls on the water Run come see Jerusalem
33 passengers were now in the water, struggling to swim and praying for salvation, emphasizing the severity of the situation and calling for more to come witness it.


My God now George Brown he was the captain He shouted come my children come pray He said "Come now witness your judgment" Run come see Jerusalem
Captain George Brown urged the survivors to pray and face their judgment, imploring more people to witness the scene.


It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine Run come see I remember that day very well It was in nineteen hundred and twenty nine Run come see Jerusalem
The song ends with a repetition of the year and location, solidifying the memory and urging the listener to come see Jerusalem.




Contributed by Alexis P. Suggest a correction in the comments below.
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Comments from YouTube:

Sgtbear1666

These four singers offer the best variety of music I have ever heard. The harmony is unmatched in todays music.

Barry Hossin

Beautiful harmonies

Stephanie Barr

A bsolutely. they are so complete in every way.

Stephanie Barr

Just wonderful harmonies from what must be one of the most unique bands in the world.

Stephanie Barr

Astonishing harmonies. Truly Seekers greatest gift to music.

Richard Barr

This is a classic which, with one or two other notable recordings by The Seekers have not been given airtime

CaptBill1947

I always thought this was the best version of this song.

Edward Imhoff

Gordon Bok, Ed Tricket & Anne Mayo Muir,,, There version of the song is structured better and tells a more complete story. Voices and instruments comparable I Love the Seekers, Always have.

Kramasham

I love this song.

Barry Hossin

Beautiful!!

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