White Cliffs of Dover
Vera Lynn Lyrics


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There'll be bluebirds over
The white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see

There'll be love and laughter
And peace ever after
Tomorrow, when the world is free
The shepherd will tend his sheep
The valley will bloom again
And Jimmy will go to sleep
In his own little room again

There'll be bluebirds over
The white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see

The shepherd will tend his sheep
The valley will bloom again
And Jimmy will go to sleep
In his own little room again

There'll be bluebirds over




The white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see

Overall Meaning

Vera Lynn's song "The White Cliffs of Dover" is a beacon of hope during a dark time. Written during World War II, it speaks to the belief that peace will come and everything will return to a state of normalcy one day. The first verse sets the scene of the beautiful white cliffs of Dover, a symbol of England, where bluebirds are flying overhead. This image conjures up feelings of freedom, peace, and happiness, all the things that the war is taking away from people. The chorus is a reminder that things will go back to how they were before the war. There will be love, laughter, and peace after the war is over, and the world is free once again.


The second verse speaks to the importance of everyday life and the simple pleasures it brings. The shepherd tending to his sheep and the valley blooming again may seem like small things in the grand scheme of things, but it's the essence of life returning to normal. The mention of Jimmy going to sleep in his own little room again is a heartwarming touch that shows how normalcy will return to even the most vulnerable among us. The chorus repeats, emphasizing the hopeful sentiment that everything will be okay once again.


Line by Line Meaning

There'll be bluebirds over
Hopeful expectation for the future


The white cliffs of Dover
A symbol of hope and homecoming


Tomorrow, just you wait and see
Anticipating a better future


There'll be love and laughter
Joy and happiness will return


And peace ever after
A lasting peace will finally be achieved


Tomorrow, when the world is free
Hope for freedom from war and conflict


The shepherd will tend his sheep
A return to everyday life and routine


The valley will bloom again
Nature and beauty will recover


And Jimmy will go to sleep
Children will be able to rest peacefully


In his own little room again
The comforts of home will be restored




Lyrics © BMG Rights Management, GANNON & KENT MUSIC CO, RESERVOIR MEDIA MANAGEMENT INC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
Written by: Nat Burton, Walter Kent

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

@smadalha

Hi Folks

I was nine years old when they bombed Pearl Harbor but I grew up to have a dear friend who at that time after the US entered he war flew 38 mission over Germany and Europe as a B17 bomber pilot and every time in and out flew over these cliffs.

Jim just died a few months ago at at 90 and i miss him as does his wife Carol,but she and I remain in touch and close.Like many Jim gave his life in the end for his country for which we are all most greatful.

Thanks

Larry Adams



@pkchanboston

There'll be bluebirds over
The white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see

There'll be love and laughter
And peace ever after
Tomorrow, when the world is free

The shepherd will tend his sheep
The valley will bloom again
And Jimmy will go to sleep
In his own little room again

There'll be bluebirds over
The white cliffs of Dover
Tomorrow, just you wait and see



All comments from YouTube:

@brendaannedufaur6244

My father describes how Vera Lynn became a national heroine when she sang this song in an underground bunker in London while London was being bombed. She sang the song to raise England's spirits and my father said it did. My father who is 86 and still alive still talks about this song with such admiration and he isnt generally an overly emotional person. It is one of his favorite songs and its significance at a time of war touches him to this day.

@jimtaylor8973

..wrong. She sang in the underground railway station.

@belfastboyable

NOT England........GREAT BRITAIN !!!!!!!

@jimtaylor8973

@howard burns .. not really that Great though, right?

@belfastboyable

@Jim Taylor Can't argue with that............Belfast was the "forgotten" blitz.......even though we had the biggest shipbuilding yard in the world.

@michellebrown9323

Brenda Anne Du Faur Thank you so much for sharing this ❤️ I am current playing for my mum who has dementia she may not no me but she sure knows all the words to this song xxx

34 More Replies...

@Calis708

My Grandma was from England and came to Canada after WW2. She used to sing this song all the time, and she also had beautiful voice. We played it at her funeral and everytime I hear it I cry like a baby. RIP Grandma.

@8332rats

I sang this song to my Granddaughter too, It was her favorite song.
On a cruise last year, I took a picture of the cliffs.and sent to her.
It's such a song of hope. I still love it.

@natassharuiz3457

Calis, my father (still living at 99) recalls crossing the English Channel in August 1945 after military service in England, North Africa and Italy. When he saw The White Cliffs he knew he was home, safe and was coming to marry my mother, (still living 95). They celebrate 71 years of marriage (God Willing) August 20, 2016. We plan to use this song too.

@benoneill7155

God bless your parents. Seen so much hardship

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