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Adagio and Fugue in C Minor for String Quartet K.546
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Lyrics


We have lyrics for these tracks by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:

Agnus Dei Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem. Agn…
Als Luise die Briefe ihres ungetreuen Liebhabers verbrannte Erzeugt von heißer Phantasie, In einer schwärmerischen Stund…
Ave Maria Ave, ave verum corpus natum De Maria virgine Vere passum imm…
Ave Verum Ave ave verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine Vere passum, imm…
Ave verum corpus, K. 618 Ave verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine Vere passum, immolat…
Benedictus Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domine. Hosanna in excelsis!…
Confutatis Confutatis maledictis, flammis acribus addictis, voca me c…
Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Tod und Verzweiflung…
Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja Stets lustig heissa hopsasa! Ic…
Die Zauberflöte K. 620 Act 2: Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen, Tod und Verzweiflung…
Die Zauberflöte: Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen, Hells Revenge cooks …
Dies Irae Dies irae Dies illa Solvet saeclum en favilla Teste david…
Domine Jesu Domine, Jesu Christe, Rex gloriae, libera animas omnium fid…
Hostias Hostias et preces tibi, Domine laudis offerimus tu suscipe…
Introitus Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, Et lux perpetua luceat ei…
Kyrie Kyrie eleison. Christe eleison. Kyrie eleison.…
Lacrimosa Lacrymosa dies illa, qua resurget ex favilla judicandus ho…
Le Nozze di Figaro: Che soave zeffiretto Sull'aria... Che soave zeffiretto... Zeffiretto... Questa se…
Le nozze di Figaro: Cinque... dieci... venti... trenta... Cinque... dieci... venti... trenta... Trentasei... quarantat…
O Fortuna O Fortuna, velut Luna statu variabilis, semper crescis a…
Porgi, amor (Le nozze di Figaro) Porgi, amor, qualche ristoro al mio duolo a'miei sospir! O …
Queen Of The Night Aria Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem herzen Tot und verzweiflung …
Recordare Recordare Jesu pie, quod sum causa tuae viae, ne me perdas…
Requiem 1. Requiem Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux…
Requiem, Dies irae Dies iræ, dies illa Solvet sæclum en favilla Teste davidcum …
Requiem: Lacrimosa Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat ei…
Rex Tremendae Rex tremandae maiestatis, qui salvandos salvas gratis, sal…
Sanctus Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth! Pleni sunt…
Tuba Mirum Tuba mirum spargens sonum per sepulchra regionum, coget om…
VII. Agnus Dei Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem Agnus…

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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

codonauta

@Ludwig van Beethoven "Leipzig

Thomaskirche in Leipzig
On 18 April (1889) Lichnowsky and Mozart departed for Leipzig, where they arrived two days later. Mozart spent three days here. He visited the famous Thomaskirche, where Johann Sebastian Bach had served as music director several decades earlier. Mozart had become a great admirer of Bach's music during his early years in Vienna, thanks to the influence of Gottfried van Swieten. Mozart improvised on the organ of the Thomaskirche. Cantor Friedrich Doles, who had been a pupil of Bach, and organist Karl Friedrich Görner, the son of Johann Gottlieb Görner, manipulated the stops of the organ for him. Probably on this occasion, the choir of the Thomasschule performed Bach's motet 'Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied, BWV 225, and Mozart took advantage of the occasion to copy the composition out of all choirparts.

Leipzig again
On 8 May, Mozart briefly returned to Leipzig, where on 12 May he gave a concert at the Gewandhaus. The concert program consisted entirely of Mozart's music: the piano concerti K. 456 and K. 503, two scenas for soprano (K. 505, K. 528) performed by Josepha Duschek, the fantasy for piano solo K. 475, and two unidentified symphonies. Following a custom of the time, the first of the symphonies was split, the first two movements being played at the opening of the concert and the second two before the intermission.[2]

The concert, organized on short notice, apparently was not well attended. Mozart writes back home, that "from the point of view of applause and glory this concert was absolutely magnificent but the profits were wretchedly meager" (letter, 16 May 1789).

Prince Lichnowsky, who had been traveling with Mozart up to this time, left Leipzig in mid-May, and Mozart's subsequent travels were on his own.[2] It may have been during the journey that Mozart incurred a financial debt to Lichnowsky. The amount of the debt was 1415 florins, for which the Prince successfully sued him in October 1791, not long before the composer's death.[4]

Mozart lingered in Leipzig until 17 May, partly due to his wish (reported in a letter to Constanze) to remain in the company of a group of friends also visiting the city (Johann Leopold Neumann, Frau Neumann, and Josepha Duschek). His departure was also delayed, he told Constanze, by a dearth of horses available for traveling.[1]



All comments from YouTube:

Orlando Aponte

I've always hypothesized that in the fugue, the "inverted" form of the subject (3:25) is the true subject, and the fugue itself starts with the inversion. The "inverted" form (3:25) sounds a lot more like a theme Mozart would write. I wouldn't be surprised if it was some sort of prank to start the fugue with the inversion and introduce the real subject later on. Another possibility is that he intended the inversion to be the subject but the "tonal answer" in g minor sounded too awkward, so he felt that it was better suited for stretto/development.

Ludwig van Beethoven

@Lox Tyrrell There’s no evidence to say that Mozart ever stated this about Beethoven. He probably didn’t even realize that the latter existed.

Maky Tondr

K A Nesiah Also Beethoven’s Sonata no. 1 is very similar to Mozart’s Sonata in C minor.

Maky Tondr

Lock T They’re not “Baroque” but in B.’s late period he took a lot of inspiration from Bach and wrote in a very contrapuntal style.

Lox Tyrrell

@Vox Veritatis What are your sources? Mozart agreed to take Beethoven as a pupil but died before he could. If Mozart had "no interest in Beethoven", why did he tell constanze "Watch out for that boy. One day he will give the world something to talk about."

Lox Tyrrell

@bar drama Nice argument from authority.

"This is after he spent his whole life trying to master mozart's string quartets, then turned to baroque late in life." You clearly haven't even listened to his late quartets as they aren't Baroque.

5 More Replies...

Vox Veritatis

Dissonance...a great sample of how Mozart was ahead of his time.

codonauta

@Orbit 01 I prefer Beethoven than Mozart, but saying Mozart is V-I spamming is like to say "Beethoven is Pour Elise, nothing more". It is a tremendous B.S. Just in the last week I found 2 passages in Beethoven´s works which were gotten from works by "V-I Mozart". One of them is simply a passage from the last movement of the Walstein Sonata. Almost a copy and paste from Don Giovanni strings passage, of Act II. The 2 first movements of Beethoven Piano Sonata 8 in C minor, called "Sonata Pathétique", was gotten from the K.457 Mozart´s C minor piano sonata.

Thomas Jefferson

@Orbit 01 Also, couldn’t you say that any composer is mainstream by this logic? Beethoven’s mainstream pieces include Für Elise and Moonlight Sonata, whereas Bach’s mainstream music includes the BWV 565 and the Prelude In C Major from the First WTC.

Thomas Jefferson

@Orbit 01 I actually deeply admire Mozart, and saying that his only contribution to music was mastery of a certain cadence is straight-up wrong. Though I agree that Mozart fanatics are in the wrong, I think you are in this case, too. Mozart’s more complex works, such as the K.546 fugue (which is very innovative in its use of dissonance and counterpoint) are admirable. In addition, he was crucial in incorporating counterpoint into sonata form/the symphonic setting. The modulations in many of his piano sonatas were novel and innovative, as well. Not to mention his piano concertos, which include extraordinary soloist-orchestra combinations and instrumental textures. In conjunction, his string quartets are very innovative in their use of harmony and timbre. Just take a look at the C Major Dissonance Quartet or the later E-Flat Major Quartet for disturbing and effective harmony.

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