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Fantasia in C Minor K. 396
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Lyrics


We have lyrics for these tracks by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:

Agnus Dei Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem. Agn…
Als Luise die Briefe ihres ungetreuen Liebhabers verbrannte Erzeugt von heißer Phantasie, In einer schwärmerischen Stund…
Ave Maria Ave, ave verum corpus natum De Maria virgine Vere passum imm…
Ave Verum Ave ave verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine Vere passum, imm…
Ave verum corpus, K. 618 Ave verum corpus natum de Maria Virgine Vere passum, immolat…
Benedictus Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domine. Hosanna in excelsis!…
Confutatis Confutatis maledictis, flammis acribus addictis, voca me c…
Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Tod und Verzweiflung…
Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja Stets lustig heissa hopsasa! Ic…
Die Zauberflöte K. 620 Act 2: Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen, Tod und Verzweiflung…
Die Zauberflöte: Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem Herzen, Hells Revenge cooks …
Dies Irae Dies irae Dies illa Solvet saeclum en favilla Teste david…
Domine Jesu Domine, Jesu Christe, Rex gloriae, libera animas omnium fid…
Hostias Hostias et preces tibi, Domine laudis offerimus tu suscipe…
Introitus Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, Et lux perpetua luceat ei…
Kyrie Kyrie eleison. Christe eleison. Kyrie eleison.…
Lacrimosa Lacrymosa dies illa, qua resurget ex favilla judicandus ho…
O Fortuna O Fortuna, velut Luna statu variabilis, semper crescis a…
Porgi, amor (Le nozze di Figaro) Porgi, amor, qualche ristoro al mio duolo a'miei sospir! O …
Queen Of The Night Aria Der Hölle Rache kocht in meinem herzen Tot und verzweiflung …
Recordare Recordare Jesu pie, quod sum causa tuae viae, ne me perdas…
Requiem 1. Requiem Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux…
Requiem, Dies irae Dies iræ, dies illa Solvet sæclum en favilla Teste davidcum …
Requiem: Lacrimosa Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat ei…
Rex Tremendae Rex tremandae maiestatis, qui salvandos salvas gratis, sal…
Sanctus Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth! Pleni sunt…
Tuba Mirum Tuba mirum spargens sonum per sepulchra regionum, coget om…
VII. Agnus Dei Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem Agnus…

The lyrics can frequently be found in the comments below, by filtering for lyric videos or browsing the comments in the different videos below.
Most interesting comment from YouTube:

MusicLover

Great playing. I believe this is how it should be played.

You can also listen to the following by the late Viennese pianist Walter Klien, who was tremendous during his lifetime but not discussed about that much by people:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVc_HjPG9Dw


I had purchased a "boxed LP set" of Klien's recordings of all Mozart's piano pieces thirty-five years ago, which I still have. I had first heard this piece from that collection. His playing was absolutely gorgeous in this piece; you can soak yourself up with the music you hear.


Unfortunately, this piece was not "completely" by Mozart. Apparently, Mozart originally intended this as a "Violin Sonata" where the piano would also have a major role. However, Mozart never completed it. For some reason - probably unknown - he abandoned it.


Later, the "fragment" of the composition which Mozart left was found. Some musicians have also played "just that fragment" and ended it wherever the fragment ended. If you wish to listen to the original fragment by Mozart, here it is:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=554BAVG4hcE


The above is a 3-minute 45-second piece but the first three minutes is entirely solo piano. The violin enters after that and plays together with the piano but it lasts for only an additional 45-seconds. We can only wonder what the piece would have sounded had Mozart completed it himself. That would perhaps be a different piece but also equally fantastic.


The solo piano piece that we are accustomed to hearing was "completed" by Mozart's contemporary Maximilian Stadler. Because Mozart had written very little of the violin part, Stadler took that out and then continued as if it was a solo piano piece. His completed version for "piano only" is what we mostly listen to today.


Now, if you listen to just the piano part in Mozart's fragment (linked above), you will find that it sounds almost exactly the same as the bigger piece which we got later from Stadler. I cannot compare note for note - because I am not a musician - but by ear at least, that is the feeling I get. Therefore, I concluded that Stadler adhered to Mozart's original idea almost exactly as far as he could. All he did after that was to have inserted small variations and returned to Mozart's original theme and ideas as soon as he could. In other words, he "expanded" the piece to twice the original length of the piano portion left by Mozart but maintained his spirit throughout. That is my best guess as a non-musician.



Because the piece we hear today on solo piano is the completed version by Stadler, we have to take our hats off to not only Mozart for this but his contemporary and friend Maximilian Stadler as well for this miracle of a composition!


This is Mozart at his very best - deep, serious, introspective - almost unlike any other Mozart we are generally used to hearing.



All comments from YouTube:

jsbrules

From 3:40 on, this music is not by Mozart but a "completion" by Maximilian Stadler (Abbé Stadler) who added to Mozart's 27 bar beginning fragment by adding a middle section and then a recap based on Mozart's beginning.

Fons Veritatis

Which means, if true, that the piece would have been even better, according to how Mozart must have planned it in his head. Your comment boosts Mozart's genius, thanks.

MusicLover

Great playing. I believe this is how it should be played.

You can also listen to the following by the late Viennese pianist Walter Klien, who was tremendous during his lifetime but not discussed about that much by people:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVc_HjPG9Dw


I had purchased a "boxed LP set" of Klien's recordings of all Mozart's piano pieces thirty-five years ago, which I still have. I had first heard this piece from that collection. His playing was absolutely gorgeous in this piece; you can soak yourself up with the music you hear.


Unfortunately, this piece was not "completely" by Mozart. Apparently, Mozart originally intended this as a "Violin Sonata" where the piano would also have a major role. However, Mozart never completed it. For some reason - probably unknown - he abandoned it.


Later, the "fragment" of the composition which Mozart left was found. Some musicians have also played "just that fragment" and ended it wherever the fragment ended. If you wish to listen to the original fragment by Mozart, here it is:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=554BAVG4hcE


The above is a 3-minute 45-second piece but the first three minutes is entirely solo piano. The violin enters after that and plays together with the piano but it lasts for only an additional 45-seconds. We can only wonder what the piece would have sounded had Mozart completed it himself. That would perhaps be a different piece but also equally fantastic.


The solo piano piece that we are accustomed to hearing was "completed" by Mozart's contemporary Maximilian Stadler. Because Mozart had written very little of the violin part, Stadler took that out and then continued as if it was a solo piano piece. His completed version for "piano only" is what we mostly listen to today.


Now, if you listen to just the piano part in Mozart's fragment (linked above), you will find that it sounds almost exactly the same as the bigger piece which we got later from Stadler. I cannot compare note for note - because I am not a musician - but by ear at least, that is the feeling I get. Therefore, I concluded that Stadler adhered to Mozart's original idea almost exactly as far as he could. All he did after that was to have inserted small variations and returned to Mozart's original theme and ideas as soon as he could. In other words, he "expanded" the piece to twice the original length of the piano portion left by Mozart but maintained his spirit throughout. That is my best guess as a non-musician.



Because the piece we hear today on solo piano is the completed version by Stadler, we have to take our hats off to not only Mozart for this but his contemporary and friend Maximilian Stadler as well for this miracle of a composition!


This is Mozart at his very best - deep, serious, introspective - almost unlike any other Mozart we are generally used to hearing.

davidhertzberg

Great comments, thank so much!

Richard Rodriguez

wow the writen music with the sound, you can follow the notes, with out being able to read music

Mario Ramon Garcia

Great artist Jörg Demus, what a marvel of recording. Thanks a lot! I had the joy of watching masterclasses with him in Mexico City in the 80s, and remember him giving a concert (I only remember an Inpromptu by Schubert played with absolut Gieseking-like egality!). I regreat having been too young to appreciate him back then.

notaire2

Fantastische Leistung dieser fantastischen Fantasie. Echt fantastisch!

agseu

Estou verdadeiramente siderado! Reconheço Mozart aqui e ali, mas a fantasia vai muito mais além, pelo menos é o que me parece nesta primeira audição.

Harry Andruschak

"Like" on Winter Solstice of 2017

Дугар Дамбаев

Thank you! I didn't hear this before!

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