Bittersweet Symphony
Cruel Intentions Lyrics


'Cause it's a bittersweet symphony, this life
Trying to make ends meet, you're a slave to the money, then you die
I'll take you down the only road I've ever been down
You know the one that takes you to the places where all the veins meet, yeah

No change, I can change, I can change, I can change
But I'm here in my mould, I am here in my mould
But I'm a million different people from one day to the next
I can't change my mould, no, no, no, no, no
Well, I've never prayed but tonight I'm on my knees, yeah
I need to hear some sounds that recognize the pain in me, yeah
I let the melody shine, let it cleanse my mind, I feel free now
But the airwaves are clean and there's nobody singing to me now

No change, I can change, I can change, I can change
But I'm here in my mould, I am here in my mould
And I'm a million different people from one day to the next
I can't change my mould, no, no, no, no, no

Have you ever been down?
I can't change it you know, I can't change it

'Cause it's a bittersweet symphony, this life
Trying to make ends meet, trying to find some money, then you die
I'll take you down the only road I've ever been down
You know the one that takes you to the places where all the veins meet, yeah

You know I can change, I can change, I can change, I can change
But I'm here in my mould, I am here in my mould
And I'm a million different people from one day to the next
I can't change my mould, no, no, no, no, no
I can't change my mould, no, no, no, no, no
I can't change my mould, no, no, no, no, no

You've got to change my mould, no, no, no
(It's just sex and violence, melody and silence)
(Gotta, can't change my violence, melody and silence)
(Gotta, can't change my violence, melody and silence)

(I'll take you down the only road I've ever been down)
(Gotta, can't change my violence, melody and silence)
(I'll take you down the only road I've ever been down)
(Gotta, can't change my violence, melody and silence)

(Been down)
(Ever been down)
(Can't change my violence, melody and silence)
(Ever been down)
(Ever been down)
(Ever been down)

(Have you ever been down?)
(Have you ever been down?)
(Have you ever been down?)
(Have you ever been down?)
(Have you ever been down?)

Contributed by Evelyn K. Suggest a correction in the comments below.
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Genre not found
Artist not found
Album not found
Song not found
Most interesting comments from YouTube:

Ed Exley

The booK "Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles, Made the Stones, and Transformed Rock & Roll" needs a title change.

Allen Klein was more responsible for the Beatles breakup than any other individual. Back in the 60's, Fortune magazine stated the richest rock and roll band in history was not the Beatles but the Rolling Stones. And the Beatles - although they sold more records and had more covers on the hit albums of other artists - were a very distant second. And Fortune based it on record sales and publishing... not on concerts which the Beatles no longer performed in.

This infuriated both Lennon and McCartney. So they hired Klein to re-negotiate all their contracts. Lennon wanted Klein to manage the Beatles. McCartney wanted the Eastmans - his father-in-law and brother-in-law, both New York entertainment lawyers, to manage the Beatles - especially when they informed McCartney that the Beatles got financially raped by allowing signing song a publishing deal and contractually obligated Lennon and McCartney to write six new songs per year for six years. The Beatles ended up giving away BILLIONS for free or very little return. (In 64-65, you stick a mike in their face and they'd do a free impromptu commercial for your product.)

That's the reason for the breakup, the white album having no title or cover photo, Lennon and McCartney allowing Harrison to put songs on the Abby Road album and Song Number Nine. The Beatles just wanted to fulfill their record and publishing deals and be done with them. And another sticking point for Lennon was when McCartney went behind the Beatles back and started purchasing stock in the publishing company for himself.

Read APPLE TO THE CORE by Peter McCabe and Robert schonfeld. I read it when it was first published in the early 70's. McCartney said they were so happy to be offered recording and publishing deals that they - with their manager's blessing - signed it without even reading it, let alone consult an entertainment attorney.

And the only thing that comes close to the Beatles being ripped off is when Motown session musician James Jamerson - who arranged every Motown hit for $225 a week - drank himself to death upon learning that he he should have at least $200 million in residual royalties. That's why you will very rarely see an artist today recording a song they didn't write or co-write or have a publishing interest in.



R Be

The Journal Of Sebastian Valmont



Kathryn:



There has never been a single person in human existence quite like Kathryn. Stunning to look at, and exciting to be near - cold as ice. She cares about absolutely no one but herself. This girl has elevated self-absorption into an art form. She believes in nothing and laughs in the face of sadness, faith, and sincerity. A person solely observing her and having seen the damage she’s done to so many lives would most likely classify her as evil. She scoffs at any and every type of religion, all the while manipulating others by using the idea of being religious all to her advantage. She’ll steal monetarily or emotionally from anyone who crosses her path, spend night after night in drunken, drug-induced debauchery, but lives this other life as the consummate perfect angel. She is in a sense brilliant, as evidenced by the fact that she has indeed completely fooled each person she has ever had to–except me–and she knows it. We are very similar people except I have a heart, and from time to time, actually feel emotion Kathryn does not. I have seen her break the spirits of others, cheat on anyone supposedly important to her, and all these things are done without so much as a second thought.



The Bet:



I don’t exactly know if I am more thrilled about the challenge I have decided with Kathryn’s “HELP,” to set for myself or just the fact that I now have something to do with my summer other than using drugs and getting laid. Make no mistake, I have no plans of relenting in either of those areas, yet it is nice to have something else with which to pass the time. The something else I speak of in this case happens to be the blatantly photogenic and equally as blatantly repressed individual, heretofore referred to as Annette Hargrove (ie lady of virtue). It began with my regular perverse perusal of porn mags at the newsstand when something caught my eye – a cover of seventeen – one of my personal favorites – promised a pious article about one “special” girl’s decision to abstain.




Cecile:



In all my years and adventures never have I met such an empty individual. Calling Cecile stupid is an insult to those actually qualified to be called such a thing. My level of annoyance fluctuated more quickly than my lust. Although highly !orgasmic! she enjoys the act of sex with a low end amusement can’t hide. Her incessant need to babble is outweighed only by the insipidness of what she decides to babble about



Diane M

I’ve never seen this movie.

I don’t know why it was recommended.

I stayed for the comments. I still don’t know what it’s about.

Is some juvenile idiot, moron, ‘12 year old in a 30+ year old body recommending this to me? Why?

I’m a grown up.

This is stupid high school stuff.

Why can’t these millennials grow the phuck up? Is it REALLY THAT difficult to accept reality?

BTW, I liked the 90’s also. They were the last of the best.


BUT WTF!

You people need to understand the definition of ‘too much’!

Get over it, and grow up all ready!


This is so stupid!



Je nsz

If this movie were to have taken place in today’s schools that are obsessed with political correctness here is what would happen:
1. Kathryn would be seen by her peers as a victim of “Bullying” after the journal came out
2. Kathryn’s coke head problem would be seen as “she needs help, lets coddle her and not make her feel bad about it, because after all “Everyone has problems” So no one would care and excuses would be made in Kathryn’s defense
3. Sebastian would be seen as an over over-privileged, misogynistic white male who deserved death
4. Cécile would be seen as a bully and “hater” for exposing Kathryn
5. Annette would have also been seen as “Jealous of Kathryn” and a “hater”
6. Students would rally outside of Headmaster’s office and DEMAND he resign since his daughter is Annette and she was a “bully”
7. Kathryn’s parents would sue the school because Annette’s father is Headmaster
8. Kathryn would go on to be Head Bitch at a corporation and bully employees and continue to manipulate her way through life unchecked.



LOUIS XVII

In the original,
Glenn Close was Katherine
John Malkovich was Sebastian
Michelle Pfeiffer was Reese Witherspoon’s character
Uma Thurman was Selma Blair’s character
Keanu Reeves was the music teacher
Tara Reid’s character’s mother was in the original as the mother to Uma Thurman’s character.

It was set in the good ol’ days of a pre-revolutionary France.



All comments from YouTube:

Miss Poste *argw27

So, fun fact: I always thought the Stones had robbed The Verve of their song rights, but nooo my friends.
According to songfacts.com "The famous orchestral riff incorporates a sample from an obscure instrumental version of the 1965 Rolling Stones song "The Last Time" by Stones producer Andrew Loog Oldham, who included it on a 1966 album called The Rolling Stones Songbook (credited to The Andrew Oldham Orchestra). The Verve got permission to use the six-second sample from Decca Records, which owned the Oldham recording, but they also needed permission from the publisher of "The Last Time," something they didn't realize until after the album was completed.

So, with Urban Hymns ready to go and "Bitter Sweet Symphony" slated as the first single, Verve manager Jazz Summers tried to secure those rights, which belonged to Allen Klein's company ABKCO. The Rolling Stones signed a very lopsided contract with Klein, who was their manager, early in their career, and had to make huge concessions in order to get out of it. Part of the deal gave Klein the publishing rights to all of the Stones' songs they recorded through 1969.

In the book Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles, Made the Stones, and Transformed Rock & Roll, it states that Summers offered Klein 15% of the publishing to obtain the rights. Klein turned him down flat, and when he realized that the Verve were sitting on a hit record they couldn't release without a deal, he insisted on 100% of the publishing. The Verve gave in, since they really had no choice. Richard Ashcroft, who wrote the lyric, was given a flat fee of $1,000 and had to sign away his rights. "I was put under duress to sign away one of the greatest songs of all time," he said.

The end result was Klein making an enormous profit on the song every time it was purchased or used in a TV show, movie or commercial." https://www.songfacts.com/facts/the-verve/bitter-sweet-symphony

Joel Willems

You mean the couple of notes played by violins? I'm sure someone could find the same sequence played in a Mozart, Tchaikovsky or Handel Concerto. Probably all three.

Miss Poste *argw27

@Aaron David Idk. The song is iconic in its own right and bares little to no resemblance to the Stones' track. Besides, Allen Klein got the most out of this technicality and managed to exploit both bands.. You might think that being greedy is good for business, but that's just false.

Aaron David

@Miss Poste *argw27 exactly what they fucking are . Famous bands may have covered one after they made it with originals.

Miss Poste *argw27

@Aaron David They're not exactly "cover people" tho, since they just sampled the track and made an original song. It's not like the Stones hadn't done the same thing by re-adapting"This May Be the Last Time", a 1958 a traditional gospel song song by the Staple Singers which was also an adaptation of a much older song. I don't buy into the whole "business first" mentality; the world is a shittier place because of it.

Ed Exley

The booK "Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles, Made the Stones, and Transformed Rock & Roll" needs a title change.

Allen Klein was more responsible for the Beatles breakup than any other individual. Back in the 60's, Fortune magazine stated the richest rock and roll band in history was not the Beatles but the Rolling Stones. And the Beatles - although they sold more records and had more covers on the hit albums of other artists - were a very distant second. And Fortune based it on record sales and publishing... not on concerts which the Beatles no longer performed in.

This infuriated both Lennon and McCartney. So they hired Klein to re-negotiate all their contracts. Lennon wanted Klein to manage the Beatles. McCartney wanted the Eastmans - his father-in-law and brother-in-law, both New York entertainment lawyers, to manage the Beatles - especially when they informed McCartney that the Beatles got financially raped by allowing signing song a publishing deal and contractually obligated Lennon and McCartney to write six new songs per year for six years. The Beatles ended up giving away BILLIONS for free or very little return. (In 64-65, you stick a mike in their face and they'd do a free impromptu commercial for your product.)

That's the reason for the breakup, the white album having no title or cover photo, Lennon and McCartney allowing Harrison to put songs on the Abby Road album and Song Number Nine. The Beatles just wanted to fulfill their record and publishing deals and be done with them. And another sticking point for Lennon was when McCartney went behind the Beatles back and started purchasing stock in the publishing company for himself.

Read APPLE TO THE CORE by Peter McCabe and Robert schonfeld. I read it when it was first published in the early 70's. McCartney said they were so happy to be offered recording and publishing deals that they - with their manager's blessing - signed it without even reading it, let alone consult an entertainment attorney.

And the only thing that comes close to the Beatles being ripped off is when Motown session musician James Jamerson - who arranged every Motown hit for $225 a week - drank himself to death upon learning that he he should have at least $200 million in residual royalties. That's why you will very rarely see an artist today recording a song they didn't write or co-write or have a publishing interest in.

58 More Replies...

futuremovieactor

Still remains one of the most satisfying movie endings out there.

Lisa Simpson Rules

@RoadRage I agree. All of them are sitting on their parents' money. I don't have any problem with the mess of teenagers exploring their sexuality, or whatever, but the way they treat each other like nothing matters and everybody is rubbish... I also find the ending a bit open. After all, Reese Witherspoon's view of love, sex and marriage is changed forever. And it is not clear to me that Cecille has learned anything from all this. I know that his love towards her music teacher is the most honest and unassuming, but I wonder up to what point they were each other's first person who paid any attention. It is all a bit... squandered riches.

Miss • Point _

Yes bittersweet ending

Barb Peterson

yep

More Comments

More Videos