Moonlight Sonata
Ludwig van Beethoven Lyrics


Camper Van Beethoven
Camper Van Beethoven
We Love You
Allah u'akbar
Hare krishna
Praise the lord
And merry christmas
Aw, praise (beatrice)
And hare krishna
Aw, merry krishna
Aw, allah u'akbar

In the interest of democracy repressive action were taken
In order to preserve democracy, repressive action were taken
Well we went down to georgia, we were looking for some fun
Instead we met the devil with a fiddle and a gun
And he said i'm the baddest fiddler anywhere in the land
And when he proved it to us, well, we let him join the band
And he said

Well, the devil he don't have the bomb
And the devil he don't have a gun
The devil hasn't got a car
And the devil he can't play guitar

Dl: rain cloud, moving red, a piece of a galaxy
J: air enormous disgusting parts of a moon
V: babbling babbling landing color of blue white [blah blah] velvet
Dl: what's that? good [blah], a dull new land
J: a horrifying glad magnificent star babbling daphnia, a pulsing
V: a magnificent yellow speculation of velvet light a token rain cloud babbling (woofy)
Dl: a token velvet good. new land
J: [blah blah]
D: a new land





Writer(s): Simon Mulligan, Louis Knatchbull, Jin Suk Song, Beethoven, Paul John Shaw, Olivier Toussaint, David Victor Rogers, Salesses Gerard Roger Serge, Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Foisy, Donald Gallacher, Keith Blainville Copyright: G. Schirmer Inc. O.B.O. Cutting Edge (Publishing) Ltd., Atmosphere Music Ltd., Musiccube Inc., Jack Russell Music, Delphine Editions, Fox Film Music Corporation, Orange Sky Music Ltd., Supraphon Record Library, Crml Limited, Chappell Recorded Music Library, Focus Music Publishing Ltd.

Contributed by Bailey H. Suggest a correction in the comments below.
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Most interesting comments from YouTube:

@andrearomano6

Dear friends and lovers of classical music from around the world,

I am truly touched to see how Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata continues to move and unite so many people, even more than 10 years after the video was published on my channel. It warms my heart to read your comments filled with shared emotions and thoughts, coming from every corner of the planet and from all ages and generations.

Today, I'd like to propose an emotional and introspective experiment: describe your emotions and thoughts in real-time as you listen to the Moonlight Sonata. Before you start, if you can, put on a pair of headphones and restart the video from the beginning, immersing yourself completely in your emotions.

Here's how to do it:

1 - Start writing a comment as soon as the video begins.
2 - Describe what you're feeling and the thoughts that come to mind as you listen to the melody.
3 - Let yourself go, without worrying about how long the comment is, whether there are spelling mistakes, or if you jump from one thought to another. Emotions don't follow a logical thread.
4 - Keep writing for the entire duration of the video.
5 - Ten seconds before the end of the video, hit "send" without rereading what you wrote.

Feel free to write in your native language or the one you dream in, to make this experience even more personal and emotional. And remember to write a new comment instead of replying to this message, so your contribution doesn't get lost among the comments.

I can't wait to read your streams of consciousness and discover how this wonderful composition makes you feel, through the different cultures and languages.

Enjoy listening and happy writing to all!



@Pi_melody

One winter evening in Vienna, Ludwig van Beethoven was invited to a grand soirée at the residence of Prince Lobkowitz, one of his most ardent patrons. The room was filled with Vienna's elite, eagerly awaiting a performance from the maestro himself. Beethoven, known for his unpredictable moods and fierce independence, was not in the best of spirits that night. However, the Prince, understanding Beethoven's temperament, gently coaxed him to the piano.

As Beethoven sat down, the guests whispered among themselves, wondering what to expect. Beethoven, with a look of intense concentration, began to play. The notes flowed from his fingers, filling the room with a hauntingly beautiful melody. It was the opening of his newly composed piece, the "Appassionata Sonata." The music was unlike anything they had ever heard—raw, emotional, and profoundly powerful.

As Beethoven played, his passion and intensity seemed to transcend the instrument, enveloping the audience in a wave of sound that was both exhilarating and heartbreaking. The sonata's furious passages and tender interludes painted a picture of Beethoven's own inner struggles and triumphs, moving many to tears. The guests, initially unsure of the composer's mood, were now completely enraptured by the performance.

When the final notes faded into silence, there was a moment of stunned stillness before the room erupted into thunderous applause. Beethoven, exhausted and emotional, stood up, barely acknowledging the cheers. He gave a slight bow, his eyes reflecting a mixture of satisfaction and melancholy, and quietly left the room.

This spontaneous performance not only showcased Beethoven's extraordinary talent but also his ability to connect deeply with his audience, drawing them into his world of profound musical expression. The "Appassionata Sonata" would go on to become one of his most celebrated works, a testament to the genius of a man who could turn his inner turmoil into timeless beauty. This evening at Prince Lobkowitz's soirée became a legendary tale, illustrating Beethoven's unmatched ability to captivate and move his listeners, leaving an indelible mark on the world of music.



@GrosserMagus

I'll answer just for myself, although I didn't click "dislike".

I don't like Beethoven at all. Every now and then I try to listen again. Because I think, there are so many people who love him, there MUST be something in his music... But everytime, I just feel bored, not touched.
I find the beginning a bit too declamatory, then repetitive, some phrases even really dumb. Then later, it becomes at least a little bit more interesting and nice - but at the same time a bit too effect-seeking and trivial for my taste. And "Moonlight Sonata" is one of Beethoven's pieces I like at least a bit - the symphonies are much worse. I always think: "WTF is this?".

But that's just me. My personal opinion and feeling. I deeply respect that other people have other opinions and feelings.
Is this a masterpiece? I frankly say, that I don't know. May be, I don't know too much about "classic" music and I have no good musical education.
But there are a lot of other composers I do like. Bach, Pachelbel, Mozart, Wagner, Liszt, Smetana, sometimes even Vivaldi - and especially Dvorak. In my latest Beethoven attempt (Eroica) I saw a comment "this is the greatest music I have ever listened to". Thats ok, I feel something similar when I listen to Dvorak's Serenade in E major. But just NOT BEETHOVEN! :)

To cut a long story short: Taste is different. Please respect it, when someone dislikes something, as long as he/she respects, that you do like it.



All comments from YouTube:

@andrearomano6

Dear friends and lovers of classical music from around the world,

I am truly touched to see how Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata continues to move and unite so many people, even more than 10 years after the video was published on my channel. It warms my heart to read your comments filled with shared emotions and thoughts, coming from every corner of the planet and from all ages and generations.

Today, I'd like to propose an emotional and introspective experiment: describe your emotions and thoughts in real-time as you listen to the Moonlight Sonata. Before you start, if you can, put on a pair of headphones and restart the video from the beginning, immersing yourself completely in your emotions.

Here's how to do it:

1 - Start writing a comment as soon as the video begins.
2 - Describe what you're feeling and the thoughts that come to mind as you listen to the melody.
3 - Let yourself go, without worrying about how long the comment is, whether there are spelling mistakes, or if you jump from one thought to another. Emotions don't follow a logical thread.
4 - Keep writing for the entire duration of the video.
5 - Ten seconds before the end of the video, hit "send" without rereading what you wrote.

Feel free to write in your native language or the one you dream in, to make this experience even more personal and emotional. And remember to write a new comment instead of replying to this message, so your contribution doesn't get lost among the comments.

I can't wait to read your streams of consciousness and discover how this wonderful composition makes you feel, through the different cultures and languages.

Enjoy listening and happy writing to all!

@revainyt2

Im coming from the pianist i watched already and it was amazing also this music is insane

@Smellman426

so interesting to me that even though I listen to all types of music (including other classical arrangements), something about Moonlight Sonata specifically has always drawn me to it

@wdgaster6252

thats a great experiment love your work

@andrearomano6

@@Greg-yn5ml I don't want this thought to be lost. I ask you to repost it as a comment and not under my message. It would be a waste to leave it here.

Thank you for sharing this.

@kalu36227

Great to listen

267 More Replies...

@user-fk6zx2fq4e

Imagine suffering from depression in 1801 and Beethoven just casually drops this banger out of nowhere

@lipciucteodora2413

I'd be sent to the asylum

@trinity-being-chaotic8958

I’d probably be in the cell next to you bro.

@jcapers81

Probably would’ve had my musket ready n blast myself no cap

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