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Quiet Life
Japan Lyrics


Boys, now the times are changing
The going could get rough
Boys, would that ever cross your mind?
Boys, are you contemplating moving out somewhere?
Boys, will you ever find the time?

Here we are stranded
Somehow it seems the same
Beware, here comes the quiet life again

Boys, now the country's only miles away from here
Boys, do you recognize the signs?
Boys, when these driving hands push against the tracks
Boys, it's too late to wonder why

Here we are stranded
Somehow it seems the same
Beware, here comes the quiet life again

Now as you turn to leave
Never looking back
Will you think of me?
If you ever, could it ever stop?

Oh, oh, ooh , the quiet life

Here we are stranded
Somehow it seems the same
Beware, here comes the quiet life again

Lyrics © O/B/O APRA AMCOS
Written by: DAVID SYLVIAN

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
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Most interesting comment from YouTube:

Peter Shoobridge

Japan were the real deal. They had everything - the songs, the sounds, the arrangements, the musicianship, and style that launched dozens of imitators.

Sadly, the imitators had more success than Japan, but that’s probably because these songs made a few more listening demands than Duran or Spandau. There is jazz here, there is prog, there is funk and ambient electronica, there is dance, there is Roxy, Bowie, Eno, and Fripp, all in a beautifully wrapped aural presentation box that still sounds gorgeous and fresh some forty years on. Truly unique.

Everything from Quiet Life to Tin Drum is worth your time - the earlier glam recordings are almost from a different band (almost, but not entirely unconnected).

But don’t miss out on what the band members did after Japan folded. There are numerous collaborations. There is the Japan-that-was-not in Rain Tree Crow. There’s David Sylvian’s solo career, which scales some extraordinary musical heights. There’s Mick Karn’s rubbery fretless bass playing - solo and with others, including with Bauhaus’ Pete Murphy for the short-lived Dali’s Car. There are the Jansen/Barbieri albums.

If you’re just discovering Japan or you’ve not followed the later music made by its members, you have a beautiful and stimulating journey ahead, should you choose to explore.

I hope it’s clear that I love this band as much today as I did when I discovered them in 1980. They’re worth your time and attention. The coolest and most musically gifted band no one ever talks about.



All comments from YouTube:

Peter Shoobridge

Japan were the real deal. They had everything - the songs, the sounds, the arrangements, the musicianship, and style that launched dozens of imitators.

Sadly, the imitators had more success than Japan, but that’s probably because these songs made a few more listening demands than Duran or Spandau. There is jazz here, there is prog, there is funk and ambient electronica, there is dance, there is Roxy, Bowie, Eno, and Fripp, all in a beautifully wrapped aural presentation box that still sounds gorgeous and fresh some forty years on. Truly unique.

Everything from Quiet Life to Tin Drum is worth your time - the earlier glam recordings are almost from a different band (almost, but not entirely unconnected).

But don’t miss out on what the band members did after Japan folded. There are numerous collaborations. There is the Japan-that-was-not in Rain Tree Crow. There’s David Sylvian’s solo career, which scales some extraordinary musical heights. There’s Mick Karn’s rubbery fretless bass playing - solo and with others, including with Bauhaus’ Pete Murphy for the short-lived Dali’s Car. There are the Jansen/Barbieri albums.

If you’re just discovering Japan or you’ve not followed the later music made by its members, you have a beautiful and stimulating journey ahead, should you choose to explore.

I hope it’s clear that I love this band as much today as I did when I discovered them in 1980. They’re worth your time and attention. The coolest and most musically gifted band no one ever talks about.

Qamar Ramzan

We were spoilt for choice in the 80's but Japan were really good.
My Managers wife, who happened to be japanese, gave me and my friend some tickets to see them at Hammersmith Odeon. I think they had just released Ghosts! Great night and amazing crowd!

BrainwashAlpha

wow thanks

Fernando Fidalgo

Thanks for sharing Peter, and I will most definitely listen to their catalogue

Richard Ellis

Right on brother. Great piece about the coolest band of the time. I like the Mick Karn's "rubbery bass' description. Perfect. Split up too soon but I think they'd been together for about ten years by then. Anyway, top piece mate.

Big Blungus

Thanks for giving all the info

Rodney West

Japan's music was the perfect place where the glam tradition of David Bowie and Roxy Music met the post-punk bleakness of the early '80s.

Dale Kinder

@Karen Barker they wasn't and David Sylvian would hate to hear you say that.

Serena N

More than that, even. But get your drift. Think it is more sophisticated than any of the aforemention. And, I am a huge fan of all these..

weak signal

And Sylvian worked with Ryo Sakamoto too,

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