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Eleggua
Ibeyi Lyrics


Bara suayo
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e
Bara suayo
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e
Obbara suayo eke eshu oddara
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e

Lyrics © O/B/O APRA AMCOS
Written by: NAOMI DIAZ, LISA KAINDE DIAZ

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind
To comment on specific lyrics, highlight them
Most interesting comments from YouTube:

Olajide Oladokun

I'm also a Yoruba from Nigeria. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:


Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)


In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)


Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge


The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

@charaev82 It is my mother tongue. I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

@taciop It is my mother tongue. I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

It is my mother tongue. I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



Olajide Oladokun

It is my mother tongue. I'm a Yoruba from Nigeria. Many of the words are not properly pronounced. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:

Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)

Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge

The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.



All comments from YouTube:

Eji ogbe

Lovely music. Coming from a native speaker of the Yoruba language it feels weird but in a good way to hear the language differently. Love their accent, I smiled all through the video. God bless the Yoruba people, God bless Africa

oladapo abayomi

You're so beautiful I'm proud of u. Clarifying everything here. I just hope one day Yorubaland will be free again and be a country so soon. We have much to gain we are not just a tribe or people locked up in Nigeria. We are a civilization comparable to the Egyptians, Persians. I'm an advocate of the emerging protest for a yoruba nation. Please support us in anyway u can online publications, calls. Thank u

Keshinro...

They talks funny... Meh

Густя Маздаки

Down here, we're taught the Middle Yoruba, used in the lithurgies of Terecô. Aṣẹ, Afrika!

Olajide Oladokun

I'm also a Yoruba from Nigeria. I had to listen to another Cuban singer - Lasaro Ros, singing to Elegbaa. His lyrics (apparently older and more original) were much clearer to me. It goes thus:


Bara suayo (standard Yoruba - Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (standard Yoruba, from Lasaro's lyrics - Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Bara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obara suayo (Obarisun ayo or Oba orisun ayo)
Eke e eshu odara (standard Yoruba - Ekeji Eshu Odara)
Omonia lawana mama kenirawo e (Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)


In straight verses of standard Yoruba:
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)
Obarisun ayo (or Oba orisun ayo)
Ekeji Eshu Odara
Omoni alagbara mama keyin awo e (or Omo eni alagbara ko mama keyin awo e)


Translation:
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
King of the source of flow of joy
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge
Pal of Eshu Odara (the divine trickster - sometimes evil in traditional Yoruba theology)
Child of the Strong One (Almighty) never comes last in sacred (divine) knowledge


The song is an old praise to Elegbaa, the twin of Eshu (Eshu Odara), and it serves as instruction to one never to come last in acquiring much knowledge and understanding.

Rotena

Old yoruba is different from modern yoruba. Orisha singing is a mix of old yoruba, benin and dahomey vocal styles.

4 More Replies...

Happy Pierson

Yoruba prayer for my sisters
Barasu ayo omoni Alaguana mama kenya irawo e
O barasu-wayo eke echuodara omoni Alaguana mama kenya irawo e’
Vital force that through length and breadth appears, child who separates fissures and divides our pathway, do not cut the flow of kindness from me.

Zuzet Martinez

Beautiful!. Blessings!

Sahgee

Blessings to you 💛🌻

Vampy Bampy

I get chills while listening to this<3 this is pure. Their voice works so well together. Truly moving ^-^

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