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String Quartet in E Flat Major Hob.III:31 : 1. Allegro moderato
Franz Joseph Haydn Lyrics


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The lyrics can frequently be found in the comments below, by filtering for lyric videos or browsing the comments in the different videos below.
Most interesting comment from YouTube:
Gérard Begni, below is quote from booklet of Op 9 from Festetics-recorded set of quartets.

LÁSZLÓ SOMFAI (Author of text)

Opus 9: Haydn s first genuine String Quartets

The aged Haydn is supposed to have told Artaria, his Viennese publisher, when he was about to publish the collected string quartets, that the series should only include the quartets from no. 19 onwards. By that time, in fact, there had already been a kind of a collected edition in parts printed by Pleyel in Paris, in which three early sets of six works each (known today as opus 1, opus 2 and opus 3) were followed by no. 19, the first quartet of the set opus 9.

This statement from Haydn is of utmost importance. Although the 70-year-old composer s memory was failing rapidly and he was sometimes unable to tell whether a particular work from his early days was written by himself or not, the exclusion of the first 18 quartets in the Paris edition should have served as a warning to posterity. Unfortunately it was not taken seriously. <...>

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László Somfai is a significant figure of international musicology, a dominant personality of domestic musicology and professional training first of all by his Haydn-researches.

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Comments from YouTube:

Hans H. Staal

Wonderful light-footed performance. These postings are an endless source of musical pleasure, especially in these quasi-quarantaine corona times.

Gérard Begni

This is the first one of the first actual series of quartets by Haydn, the so-called "sun quartets" because of the drawing in the first page of the publication. Most of its final movements included a fugue, which is not the case here.

Serge Smirnoff

Gérard Begni, below is quote from booklet of Op 9 from Festetics-recorded set of quartets.

LÁSZLÓ SOMFAI (Author of text)

Opus 9: Haydn s first genuine String Quartets

The aged Haydn is supposed to have told Artaria, his Viennese publisher, when he was about to publish the collected string quartets, that the series should only include the quartets from no. 19 onwards. By that time, in fact, there had already been a kind of a collected edition in parts printed by Pleyel in Paris, in which three early sets of six works each (known today as opus 1, opus 2 and opus 3) were followed by no. 19, the first quartet of the set opus 9.

This statement from Haydn is of utmost importance. Although the 70-year-old composer s memory was failing rapidly and he was sometimes unable to tell whether a particular work from his early days was written by himself or not, the exclusion of the first 18 quartets in the Paris edition should have served as a warning to posterity. Unfortunately it was not taken seriously. <...>

===

László Somfai is a significant figure of international musicology, a dominant personality of domestic musicology and professional training first of all by his Haydn-researches.

//

Elaine Blackhurst

Whilst listening to this magnificent quartet, it’s worth thinking about why Beethoven in 1794, chose to copy out the whole work for study purposes. It’s interesting that in a work already nearly a quarter of a century old, that Beethoven felt he could learn something new.

Garrett Rowland

The trio is lovely (12:04).

Minuet/Trio movements start to become a lot more interesting from this point onward. Much more engaging than the minuets of of 1750s and 1760s.

alan metz

I love the music, the performance is wonderful, but I'm also interested in the painting with what appears to be the Hapsburg royal family. Can anyone confirm the subject and the painter?

LaVell Thompson, Jr.

As a general rule of thumb, I tend to steer clear of writing remarks/comments on YouTube postings. HOWEVER, in the case of this piece, I thought it worth mentioning something VERY IMPORTANT (for those not already in-the-know). While listening to this piece recently, I discovered that Antonin Dvorak was inspired by this piece!


Dvorak's String Quartet no. 4 in E-minor has a second movement titled "Andante religioso." And, if you listen to THAT movement and the THIRD movement of this Haydn work, you'll hear a VERY CLOSE SIMILARITY in color, texture, counterpoint, and I (believe muted strings with both).


I'd not been familiar with the Haydn before hearing the Dvorak. And after discovering the Dvorak quartets (which are ALL AMAZING, FYI...if you're not familiar with them), I instantly fell in love with the 2nd movement of the 4th. So much so that I played it a million times. Anyway...my point is that when I required myself to start listening to the Haydn quartets (since I was not familiar with them...mostly for learning purposes and to see what he does with strings), once hearing THIS piece's 3rd movement, I had to do a double-take because I thought I was listening to Dvorak for a split second! It's very clear that Dvorak must have enjoyed Franz Josef Haydn's writing, too. :-) Clearly, Haydn--being a composer of the Classical period--wrote his music a century before Dvorak's late Romantic music.


Confession: I actually like the Dvorak version better. But, then again: I am a little biased. I'm not exactly a fan of Classicism (with many isolated exceptions). I mostly prefer all things 20th Century (with some exceptions). I also like the Baroque period. O.k. That's enough. lol Thanks for reading (for those who did). Feel free to comment, if you like. Here is a recording of the very piece I'm referring to with an interpretation I like:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiBv-GptHV8

tenoray1

@Elaine Blackhurst Hmmm...yes. I do believe that I heard or read that somewhere. It's very interesting to know this. I happen to consider Beethoven one of the finest composers in history (as does many people)! My point is that if Beethoven thought that highly of Haydn's work, then it's probably worth taking a more serious listen to and study of this particular piece. Thank you for sharing that information, Elaine!

Elaine Blackhurst

LaVell Thompson, Jr. You might be interested to know that Beethoven chose to copy out the whole of this quartet for study purposes in 1794.
Haydn’s Opus 20 quartets are one of the great breakthrough moments in the history of western classical music; they defined what a string quartet was and set a mark which was a standard for every future composer of quartets.

Tene' Tene'

Beautiful😊💖💕 Thank you for sharing 😊💕

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